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I want to be able to call self from inside the callback function.

class MyClass():
    def myMethod(self):
        def myCallback(p1):
            print "Callback called!"
            # here I want to do something with self!

        CALLBACK_x = ctypes.WINFUNCTYPE(ctypes.c_void_p, ctypes.c_uint32)
        somedll.setCallback(CALLBACK_x(cbFileRefDone), 0)

The DWORD parameter from the the callback function is not used.

How can I access self?

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I think that I could pass ctypes.py_object(self) as a parameter but I don't know how to get it back as a python object in the callback function. –  sorin Oct 25 '11 at 15:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

self should already be available in myCallback. Since it's created inside a function, it has access to the enclosing function's variables, including self. These variables are actually stored with the inner function in what's called a closure, so they stick around even after the enclosing function returns. Here's a minimal example:

class C(object):
   def f(self):
     def g():
        print self
     return g

c = C()
g = c.f()
g()
>>> <__main__.C object at 0x02AED1F0>
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+1 You said what I meant far more eloquently!! –  David Heffernan Oct 25 '11 at 16:07
1  
See PEP 3104 for details on scoping in closures. self should always be in scope of the nested function because it was passed as an argument to the f method. Variables local to f may not be accessible without the nonlocal keyword, which wasn't added until Python 3. –  Nathan Oct 25 '11 at 17:11
    
@Nathan: Good information in that PEP, thanks for linking it. I learned something. –  kindall Oct 25 '11 at 18:42
class MyClass():
    def myMethod(self):
        def myCallback(p1):
            self = ctypes.cast(p1, ctypes.py_object).value
            print "Callback called!"
            # here I want to do something with self!

        CALLBACK_x = ctypes.WINFUNCTYPE(ctypes.c_void_p, ctypes.c_uint32)
        somedll.setCallback(CALLBACK_x(cbFileRefDone), ctypes.py_object(self))
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This doesn't make sense to me. Part of the problem is that we don't know what setCallback does and we also don't know what cbFileRefDone is. Your code doesn't reference myCallback after defining it. –  David Heffernan Oct 25 '11 at 16:03

Your callback function appears to be a C function with prototype:

void __stdcall Callback(uint32)

You don't need to do anything special to be able to access self. The ctypes magic arranges that for you. The code you need is something like this:

class MyClass():
    def myMethod(self):
        def myCallback(p1):
            print "Callback called!"
            # self is available here

        callback = ctypes.WINFUNCTYPE(ctypes.c_void_p, 
            ctypes.c_uint32)(myCallback)
        somedll.setCallback(callback, 0)
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