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Good day,

I am working on a text-based games written in Javascript. I have variable named map that is an associating object containing another object for each rooms. I have found a little algorithm somewhere and I am not sure how to modify it for my specific task.

My variable:

/**
 *       [003]-[004]
 *         |     |
 * [001]-[002] [007]
 *         |     |
 *       [005]-[006]
 **/     
var map = {
    "001" : {
        "Id" : "001",
        "Name" : "Room 001",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "",
            "S" : "",
            "E" : "002",
            "W" : ""
        }
    },
    "002" : {
        "Id" : "002",
        "Name" : "Room 002",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "003",
            "S" : "005",
            "E" : "",
            "W" : "001"
        }
    },
    "003" : {
        "Id" : "003",
        "Name" : "Room 003",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "",
            "S" : "002",
            "E" : "004",
            "W" : ""
        }
    },
    "004" : {
        "Id" : "004",
        "Name" : "Room 004",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "",
            "S" : "007",
            "E" : "",
            "W" : "003"
        }
    },
    "005" : {
        "Id" : "005",
        "Name" : "Room 005",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "002",
            "S" : "",
            "E" : "006",
            "W" : ""
        }
    },
    "006" : {
        "Id" : "006",
        "Name" : "Room 006",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "007",
            "S" : "",
            "E" : "",
            "W" : "005"
        }
    },
    "007" : {
        "Id" : "007",
        "Name" : "Room 007",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "004",
            "S" : "006",
            "E" : "",
            "W" : ""
        }
    }
};


function findSteps( id, map, array ) {
    if ( ! ( map && "object" === typeof map ) ) { return; }
    if ( map.Id === id ) { return map; }

    for ( var x in map ) {
        if ( Object.hasOwnProperty.call( map, x ) ) {
            map.Id && array.push( map.Id ); //used to exclude undefined
            var result = findSteps( id, map[ x ], array );

            if ( result !== undefined ) {
                return [ result, array ];
            }
        }
    }
}

console.dir( findSteps( "004", map, [] ) );
// Actually returns [objectObject],001,001,001,002,002,002,003,003,003

I would like the function to return an array of array with all the possible paths that I will later iterate to find the closest available path.

The desired result would be something like:

output = [
    [ "001", "002", "003", "004" ],
    [ "001", "002", "005", "006", "007", "004" ]
]

The function should also accept a startup Id. I am thinking about something that would stop the recursivity if nothing have been found before "map.length"n iterations.

Maybe a little hint would be also appreciated.

Thank you!

http://jsfiddle.net/GxZYX/

PS: I have looked at a few Q/A founds on SO about recursive object search, this is exactly where I found the function I am using.

Edit:

After much thinking, and hopefully I won't be wrong on that. I believe I only need THE shortest path.

Edit:

http://jsfiddle.net/GxZYX/1/ here is my test of implementing breadth first search. (bugged)

share|improve this question
1  
The number of possible paths can be very large if you have a denser graph. Do you just want to find the closest path between two nodes? (There are special algorithms for that) –  hugomg Oct 25 '11 at 17:42
    
@missingno, the map in my example is actually very small and for real, it's going to be much much bigger. Am I wrong if I think that with a map of hundreds of keys/objects a memory problems may occurs? I would like to get an if statement that won't recursively call the function again if he haven't found anything in, lets say 20 iterations. If you tell me there is no problem running it with 400ish items I will just don't put any limits on it. Yes, I would like to get an array of let's say the 10 closests paths available. –  Cybrix Oct 25 '11 at 17:49
1  
Graph algorithms are a really well understood thing. We need to know what you are trying to do (not how) –  hugomg Oct 25 '11 at 17:57
    
Given two nodes' Id, I would like to get a list (maybe 5?) of available paths. –  Cybrix Oct 25 '11 at 18:00
    
By the way, thank you for telling me that what I am looking for is a graph algorithm. I didn't know what keyword to look for. –  Cybrix Oct 25 '11 at 18:02
show 2 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To find the shortest path between two nodes in an unwheight graph like yours you just need to do a Breadth-first-search.

function linkedPathToList(next, node){
    var path = [];
    while(true){
        path.push(node);
        if(node == next[node]) break;
        node = next[node];
    }
    return path;
}       

var breadthFirstSearch = function( map, startRoomId, endRoomId ) {

    var next = {};
    next[endRoomId] = endRoomId;

    var currentLevel = [ map[endRoomId] ];

    //(the traditional version of the algorithm uses a queue instead of the
    // complicated two-array thing though)

    while( currentLevel.length ) {

        //if curr level is nodes at distance d from the end
        //next level is d+1
        var nextLevel = [];

        for(var i=0; i<currentLevel.length; i++) {
            var node = currentLevel[i];

            if ( node.Id == startRoomId ) {
                return linkedPathToList(next, startRoomId);
            }

            for( var direction in node.Directions ) {
                var neighbor = node.Directions[direction]; 
                if( !next[neighbor] ) {
                    next[neighbor] = node.Id;
                    nextLevel.push( map[neighbor] );
                }
            }
        }

        currentLevel = nextLevel;
    }

    return null;
};

var map = {
    "001" : {
        "Id" : "001",
        "Name" : "Room 001",
        "Directions" : {
            "E" : "002"
        }
    },
    "002" : {
        "Id" : "002",
        "Name" : "Room 002",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "003",
            "S" : "005",
            "W" : "001"
        }
    },
    "003" : {
        "Id" : "003",
        "Name" : "Room 003",
        "Directions" : {
            "S" : "002",
            "E" : "004"
        }
    },
    "004" : {
        "Id" : "004",
        "Name" : "Room 004",
        "Directions" : {
            "S" : "007",
            "W" : "003"
        }
    },
    "005" : {
        "Id" : "005",
        "Name" : "Room 005",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "002",
            "E" : "006"
        }
    },
    "006" : {
        "Id" : "006",
        "Name" : "Room 006",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "007",
            "W" : "005"
        }
    },
    "007" : {
        "Id" : "007",
        "Name" : "Room 007",
        "Directions" : {
            "N" : "004",
            "S" : "006"
        }
    }
};

console.log('shortest path',  breadthFirstSearch( map, "001", "004" ) );
share|improve this answer
    
Does that algorithm implies you to start from a parent nodes? In my example: 001. Could I start at 002 for example? –  Cybrix Oct 25 '11 at 18:15
    
In breadth first search you start at a node. Then you go through all the nodes that are 1 distance away from it. Then all nodes that are 2 distance away and so on. (The idea is that whenever you reach a node you know you got to it via a shortest path) In your case you can choose to start from whatever end of the path you find more convenient. –  hugomg Oct 25 '11 at 18:26
    
Thank you for the example. I will go play with it! –  Cybrix Oct 25 '11 at 18:36
    
@missingno This will only give you a shortest path if the graph is a tree. You don't say in which order to visit the rooms, but for Example if you used "west, south, east, north" as the order you would get the orange path which is much worse than the green optimal. You need to do a relaxation process like Dijkstra's algorithm after the search. –  nwellcome Oct 26 '11 at 15:22
    
@nwellcome: All the edges have the same cost so a simple breadth-first search works just fine. (The counter-example you mention is depth-first search) –  hugomg Oct 26 '11 at 15:54
show 3 more comments

I would like the function to return an array of array with all the possible paths that I will later iterate to find the closest available path.

You probably don't want to go about doing path finding in this way. There are algorithms specifically for finding shortest paths in graphs and for 2D games 9 times out of 10 the one you want is A*. A* uses a heuristic distance function (h*(x)) so as to not have to visit every single node (room) so the running time is much much lower than every possible path through every room as you are suggesting which could be as bad as O( n! ).

Here is an implementation in JavaScript but I suggest you try to wrap your head around the theory of it a little before trying to get it to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Would the A star graph algorithm be more effective then the Breadth first search algorithm? –  Cybrix Oct 26 '11 at 13:48
    
First, BFS alone won't find you the shortest path, it will find you a path (unless your graph is a tree, see my other comment). Second, A star is what is called an "informed" search, without the heuristic function it would visit every node like BFS. However, now that I look at your data structure I see that you don't have coordinates for the rooms so you might not be able to come up with a heuristic distance function, in which case you may need to use Dijkstra's algorithm which does visit every node. –  nwellcome Oct 26 '11 at 15:10
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