Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very simple NServiceBus.Host.exe application that is using the default logging and the Production profile. According to the documentation, this should result in an appending file log that should appear in the same folder as the EXE. However, when I run the application as a service, the log file doesn't appear in the same folder as the EXE, and thus far I've been unable to locate it at all. The service is running as Local System. Do I need to run it as a user account and look for the file in the AppData folder somewhere? Is it under c:\windows somewhere? Where is it and is there a way for me to have it actually log to a file in the same folder as the EXE as advertised?

Update: Using ProcMon and ProcExp from SysInternals, I can see that there is no attempt to create any log file in the folder where my EXE exists, nor are there any file permission errors while trying to create a log file anywhere, at least not from the PID of the service (if for some reason log4net spins up another process to do this work then I might have missed it).

share|improve this question
    
Try looking in c:\windows\temp –  Tom Redfern Oct 25 '11 at 18:55
    
@hugh - nothing in c:\windows\temp :( –  ssmith Oct 25 '11 at 19:13
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It turns out that the service wasn't actually running in the Production profile. I had for some reason gotten it into my head that services would run in the production profile by default, while running it in interactive mode would use Lite by default. Not so - the service will use the Lite profile unless you specify otherwise. I changed my command to install the service from: NServiceBus.Host.exe /install /displayName:MyService to NServiceBus.Host.exe /install /displayName:MyService NServiceBus.Production

and this fixed the issue.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.