Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to load and instantiate classes located in my App_Code folder at run-time.

The classes implements IModule:

public interface IModule
{
    String Test();
}

A test class:

// ~/App_Code/Test.cs

namespace ModuleManagementSystem
{
    class Test : IModule
    {
        public String Test()
        {
            return "Testing! One, two, thee!";
        }
    }
}

The class-files are uploaded by the system users and acts as modules.

The class-name of the modules will always be the same as the module filename.


I am looking for functioning example-code.

I will place a bounty as soon as I am able to.


Update:


namespace ModuleManagementSystem
{
    public sealed class Compile
    {
        public void ToDLL(String sourcefile, String outputfile)
        {
            var compilerResults =
            CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp").CompileAssemblyFromFile(
                new CompilerParameters {
                    OutputAssembly = outputfile,
                    GenerateInMemory = false,
                    TreatWarningsAsErrors = false,
                    GenerateExecutable = false,
                },
                sourcefile
            );
        }
    }
}

The above works fine for:

// ~/App_Code/Test.cs

public class Test
{
    // ...
}

But if I implement my IModule interface:

namespace ModuleManagementSystem
{
    public interface IModule
    {
        String HelloWorld();
    }
}

I get the following error:

{c:\inetpub\wwwroot\ModuleManagementSystemWeb\App_Code\Test.cs(4,21) : error CS0246: The type or namespace name 'ModuleManagementSystem' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)} System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerError

Both the IModule interface and Compile class is located in the same class library, which is referenced from a web application:

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

It strikes me as a bad idea to actually upload into your App_Code folder. I'd use a separate folder which ASP.NET doesn't know anything about. That way you won't get the framework trying to automatically compile code for you.

You can easily compile and run code on the fly with CSharpCodeProvider - see my source code for Snippy for an example.

I hope this is only for internal (and authenticated) use though - I wouldn't recommend letting untrusted users execute their code on your web server. You can make it all slightly safer by running the code which very much reduced permissions, but you still risk the code tight-looping etc.

EDIT: In response to your updated question, you just need to provide the appropriate assembly to reference, containing IModule. See the CompilerParameters.ReferencedAssembles property.

share|improve this answer
    
Jon, ASP.NET provides functionality to declare your own build folders. :) No manual compilation is necessary. –  LeakyCode Apr 25 '09 at 17:49
    
But I would want to have more control than that. In particular, I wouldn't want it restarting the app every time a new file was uploaded. I'd also want to make sure the new code only had access to the parts of my application that I wanted it to know about. –  Jon Skeet Apr 25 '09 at 18:09
    
If that case, yes. This would work better. I also suggest adding some CAS attributes that explicitly deny access to all permissions except the ones really needed. –  LeakyCode Apr 25 '09 at 18:19
    
@Jon Skeet. Updated my question. Mind taking a second look? :) –  roosteronacid Apr 25 '09 at 19:33
add comment
Assembly assembly = Assembly.Load(assemblyName);

IModule instance = assembly.CreateInstance(typeName) as IModule;

You could also use the Activatore.CreateInstance() method to create an instance without explicitly refering to the assembly.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Daniel. Thanks for your answer. I can't find anything in the C# framework named "Mediator.CreateInstance()" though. Could you elaborate? –  roosteronacid Apr 25 '09 at 17:53
    
I wrote Mediator.CreateInstance() but meant Activator.CreateInstance(). See MSDN msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/… for reference. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 25 '09 at 18:10
    
Assembly.Load("Test"); results in an error on my side of things. –  roosteronacid Apr 25 '09 at 18:12
    
What exception? Security exception? Assembly not found? Is 'Test' really the name of the assembly or only the file name? –  Daniel Brückner Apr 25 '09 at 18:16
    
I've tried the following: Assembly.Load("Test.cs"), Assembly.Load(MapPath("~/App_Code/") + "Test.cs") both resulting in Assembly not found –  roosteronacid Apr 25 '09 at 18:20
show 1 more comment

you can do it using reflection and here is a very simple method which will return you the instance of the module name [class name] you pass to the function

Public Shared Function GetDALInstance(ByVal moduleClassName As String) As IModule
        Dim className As String
        dim path as string = <<NamespacePath>>  
        className = Path + moduleClassName
        Return Assembly.Load(Path).CreateInstance(className)
    End Function

the above method is in vb.net you can simply convert this to c#

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I decided that classes which loads at run-time has to implement a given interface and that the name of the class has to be the same as the filename.

The folder the classes are uploaded to and compiled to is irrelevant.


Loading a compiled class (.dll) and instantiating it:

return (IInterfaceClassesMustImplement)Assembly
/* continued --> */ .LoadFile("c:\...\SomeClass.dll")
/* continued --> */ .CreateInstance("SomeClass");

Compile a class:

internal static class Compiler
{
    internal static void AssemblyFromFile(
        String classFilePath,
        String assemblyFilePath,
        String[] referencedAssemblies
    )
    {
        var cp = new CompilerParameters { OutputAssembly = assemblyFilePath };

        foreach (String ra in referencedAssemblies)
        {
            cp.ReferencedAssemblies.Add(ra);
        }

        CompilerResults cr = CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp")
        /* continued --> */ .CompileAssemblyFromFile(cp, classFilePath);

        if (cr.Errors.Count > 0) // throw new Exception();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.