Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my data:

> head(Kandula_for_n)
                date      dist  date_only
1 2005-05-08 12:00:00  138.5861 2005-05-08
2 2005-05-08 16:00:00 1166.9265 2005-05-08
3 2005-05-08 20:00:00 1270.7149 2005-05-08
6 2005-05-09 08:00:00  233.1971 2005-05-09
7 2005-05-09 12:00:00 1899.9530 2005-05-09
8 2005-05-09 16:00:00  726.8363 2005-05-09

I would now like to have an additional column with the count (n) of the data entries (dist) per day. For 2005-05-08, this would be n=3 as there are 3 data entries at 12, 16 and 20 o'clock. I have applied the following code which actually gave me want I wanted:

ndist <-tapply(1:NROW(Kandula_for_n), Kandula_for_n$date_only, function(x) length(unique(x)))

After ndist<-as.data.frame(ndist), I got this:

> head(ndist)
           ndist
2005-05-08     3
2005-05-09     4
2005-05-10     6
2005-05-11     4
2005-05-12     6
2005-05-13     6

The problem is that the count is together with date_only in one column that is called ndist. But I would need them in two separate columns, one with the count and one with date_only. How can this be done? I guess its rather simple, but I just don't get it. I would appreciate if you could give me any thoughts on that.

Thanks for your efforts.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Those are just the row names. You're good to go:

ndist$date = row.names(ndist)

EDIT: or ndist = data.frame(date = names(ndist), ndist) depending on whether it is already a data frame or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Try rownames(ndist)or row.names(ndist) both should work. –  Matt Bannert Oct 25 '11 at 19:12
    
or data.frame(ndist,date_only=names(ndist),row.names=1:length(ndist)) –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 25 '11 at 19:14
    
or just leave ID variables as (row)names attributes and just index directly when needed. That's what I usually do. –  John Colby Oct 25 '11 at 19:26
    
Thx, I really got confused by these strange row names. –  Jan Blanke Oct 27 '11 at 14:12

Simply because I find tapply() hard to wrap my brain around, I like using plyr for these types of things:

## make up some data
## you get better/faster/more answers if you do this bit for us :)
dates <- seq(Sys.Date(), Sys.Date() + 5, by = 1)
Kandula_for_n <- data.frame(date_only = sample( dates + 5, 10, replace=TRUE ) , dist=rnorm(10) )

require(plyr)
ddply(Kandula_for_n, "date_only", function(x) data.frame(x, ndist=nrow(x)) )

This will give you something like:

    date_only       dist ndist
1  2011-10-30  0.2434168     5
2  2011-10-30 -0.9361780     5
3  2011-10-30  1.4593197     5
4  2011-10-30 -0.1851402     5
5  2011-10-30  0.6652419     5
6  2011-10-31  0.8876420     1
7  2011-11-03  0.5087175     2
8  2011-11-03 -1.0065152     2
9  2011-11-04  0.4236352     2
10 2011-11-04  0.4535686     2

the ddply line:

ddply(Kandula_for_n, "date_only", function(x) data.frame(x, ndist=nrow(x)) )

takes the input data, groups it by the date.only field, and for every unique value it applies the anonymous function to the data frame made up of only the records with the same value for date_only. My anonymous function simply takes the data.frame x and appends a column named ndist which is the number of rows in x.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. I have stumbled now several times over plyr. I think I will definitely investigate it a bit. And I will definitely try to make up the data from now on... –  Jan Blanke Oct 27 '11 at 14:22

How about something a bit more simple:

as.data.frame(table(unique(Kandula_for_n)$date_only))
share|improve this answer
    
this is really way mor simple. thx for that. Good to know that snippet. –  Jan Blanke Oct 27 '11 at 14:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.