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This code sample is not able to be compiled. Any work arounds out there?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using church = Func<dynamic, dynamic, dynamic>;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            church True = (a, b) => a;
            church False = (a, b) => b;

            Func<church, church, church> And = (x, y) => x(y(True, False), False);
        }
    }
}

Error 6 Internal Compiler Error (0xc0000005 at address 5476A4CC): likely culprit is 'EMITIL'. An internal error has occurred in the compiler. To work around this problem, try simplifying or changing the program near the locations listed below. Locations at the top of the list are closer to the point at which the internal error occurred. Errors such as this can be reported to Microsoft by using the /errorreport option. TestApplication

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2  
Please post source inline to your question. And odds are, you are doing something wrong. Do you get an error? –  Joe Oct 25 '11 at 19:20
3  
It compiles fine for me. What happens for you? –  Jon Skeet Oct 25 '11 at 19:20
1  
It appears to be any generic with "dynamic" in it inside a using statement to create a type alias. –  Michael J. Gray Oct 25 '11 at 19:24
1  
Blows up for me, too. Neat. –  dlev Oct 25 '11 at 19:25
1  
@Joe: If a compiler produces an error message, it's more likely to be an error in your code than a bug in the compiler. If the compiler crashes, it's definitely a bug in the compiler. –  Keith Thompson Oct 25 '11 at 19:29
show 6 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I reproduced the crash using VS2010 (WinXP 64).

Two workarounds:

1. don't use the using alias

The following code compiles cleanly on VS2010:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Func<dynamic, dynamic, dynamic> True = (a, b) => a;
            Func<dynamic, dynamic, dynamic> False = (a, b) => b;

            Func<Func<dynamic, dynamic, dynamic>, 
                 Func<dynamic, dynamic, dynamic>,
                 Func<dynamic, dynamic, dynamic> > And 
                = (x, y) => x(y(True, False), False);
        }
    }
}

2. use the Mono compiler

No problem with Mono 2.10 compiler (dmcs).

[mono] /tmp @ dmcs test.cs
test.cs(18,42): warning CS0219: The variable `And' is assigned but its value is never used
Compilation succeeded - 1 warning(s)
[mono] /tmp @ ./test.exe 
[mono] /tmp @ 

This was tested on linux.

  1. You can run binaries created with mono on Windows .NET.
  2. Mono compiler comes with an installer MSI and runs on Windows as well.
share|improve this answer
    
@nenito: simple, because of a bug in the compiler. –  sehe Jan 9 '13 at 23:19
    
@nenito Well, I honestly don't know what you are asking for. You want to know what code reproduces this? Well, that code is shown. Also see Jon Skeet's answer for a more minimal reproducer. –  sehe Jan 9 '13 at 23:27
add comment

Clearly that is a compiler bug.

I mentioned this to one of our testers and he says:

I’m happy to report that this has already been fixed and you’ll see this fix in the next version of VS. You’ll actually see it fixed in the BUILD Developer Preview for Visual Studio as well!

Apologies for the error, and thanks for bringing this to our attention.

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2  
Please note my comment on Jon Skeet's answer: the delegate is irrelevant; using crash = List<dynamic>; will crash as well. –  configurator Oct 25 '11 at 20:09
16  
Thank you for this, Eric. I wholeheartedly believe that, due to you and your team, the C# language/compiler is the best-supported (and best-designed) product from Microsoft. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Oct 25 '11 at 21:55
1  
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft: Thanks! We try hard at both design and support. –  Eric Lippert Oct 25 '11 at 22:50
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EDIT: I've now managed to reproduce it, and I have a potential workaround.

This works:

csc Test.cs

This doesn't:

csc /debug+ Test.cs

So it looks like it's a problem with the debug information. If you can live without that in your particular scenario, you're good to go...

EDIT: I've just tested, and this happens with /debug:pdbonly as well...

EDIT: Just in case anyone was wondering, I'll ping Eric Lippert about this.

EDIT: This is now the minimal repro I've found:

using church = System.Func<dynamic>;

class Program
{
    static void Main() {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sweet find. You can also going without the type alias (using) –  sehe Oct 25 '11 at 19:35
1  
I suspect the problem is the implied attributes in the lambda don't have anywhere to go because the lambda isn't actually used; therefore, the next method (in this case Main()) suddenly has an imbalanced stack or something like that. Of course, not actually knowing the compiler's internals it's a wild stab in the dark. –  configurator Oct 25 '11 at 20:06
3  
Also, we always used delegates but that's irrelevant. using crash = List<dynamic>; will crash as well. –  configurator Oct 25 '11 at 20:08
add comment

Here's another workaround: don't use Func, use a good old delegate type.

public delegate dynamic Church(dynamic x, dynamic y);

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Church True = (a, b) => a;
        Church False = (a, b) => b;

        Func<Church, Church, Church> And = (x, y) => x(y(True, False), False);
    }
}

This also has the benefit, that Church is defined everywhere, and not just as a per-file using alias.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good workaround for the OP's case +1 –  sehe Oct 25 '11 at 20:35
    
"Don't use Func, use a good old delegate type" <-- last time I checked, Func (including the rest of the Func<T> family) were delegates... –  larsw Apr 30 '12 at 7:33
    
@larsw: I meant use a non-generic delegate type. As I showed in the example. –  configurator May 1 '12 at 15:02
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