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I'm new to python and I would like some help. I created some classes with properties in order to keep me from passing meaningless arguments.

So for example I have this class

class match(object):
     __teams=(None,None)

     def setTeams(self,tms):
          if type(tms) != type(list()) and type(tms) != type(tuple()):
               raise Exception("Teams must be a list of length 2")
          if len(tms) != 2:
               raise Exception("Teams must be a list of length 2")
          if (type(tms[0])==type(str()) or (type(tms[0])==type(unicode()))) \
          and (type(tms[1])==type(str()) or type(tms[1])==type(unicode())):
               self.__teams=tms
          else:
               raise Exception("Both teams must be strings")
          return

      teams=property(getTeams,setTeams)

If I write

match1=match()
match1.teams=(2,4)

I get an exception as I should, but

match1.teams[0]=5

does not raise an exception and passes the number 5. Please keep in mind that this is not all of the class, I just wrote down only what is relative to my question, so assume that the code behaves as I describe.

I guess this is because everything is passed by reference in python but I have to be careful not to assign meaningless data to my objects which defeats the purpose of having properties in the first place.

So, is there a way to fix that apart from not using lists or do I have to learn to live with it?

share|improve this question
    
Don't forget to accept an answer (click on the check-mark by the one you want). –  Ethan Furman Oct 26 '11 at 15:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One of the advantages of propertys is being able to do data validation -- sometimes it is really important to make sure you get something very specific.

In your case you need to do one of two things:

  • store your teams data in a structure that can't be modified, such as a tuple or namedtuple; then when the data is retrieved it cannot be changed

or

  • have your get method return a copy of the data, so any modification do not mess up your original

The first solution (immutable types) looks like this:

class match(object):
    __teams=(None,None)

    def setTeams(self,tms):
        "any sequence type will do, as long as length is two"
        if len(tms) != 2:
            raise TypeError(
                "Teams must be a sequence of length 2"
                )
        if not isinstance(tms[0], (str, unicode)):
            raise TypeError(
                "Team names must be str or unicode, not %r" % type(tms[0])
                )
        if not isinstance(tms[1], (str, unicode)):
            raise TypeError(
                "Team names must be str or unicode, not %r" % type(tms[0])
                )
        self.__teams = tuple(tms)

    def getTeams(self):
        return self.__teams

    teams=property(getTeams,setTeams)

And when you try to assign after getting the value, this happens:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 22, in <module>
    match1.teams[0]=5
TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment

The second solution (returning a copy instead of the original) looks like this:

class match(object):
    __teams=(None,None)

    def setTeams(self,tms):
        "any sequence type will do, as long as length is two"
        if len(tms) != 2:
            raise TypeError(
                "Teams must be a sequence of length 2"
                )
        if not isinstance(tms[0], (str, unicode)):
            raise TypeError(
                "Team names must be str or unicode, not %r" % type(tms[0])
                 )
        if not isinstance(tms[1], (str, unicode)):
            raise TypeError(
                "Team names must be str or unicode, not %r" % type(tms[0])
                )
        self.__teams = list(tms)

    def getTeams(self):
        return list(self.__teams)

    teams=property(getTeams,setTeams)

# and the code in action...
match1=match()
match1.teams=('us',u'them')

match1.teams[0]=5
print match1.teams

which has the following results:

['us', u'them']

As you can see, the changes did not make it back into the match object.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually returning a copy of the data is an excellent idea. do you know what is the excess processing load of this? –  tst Oct 25 '11 at 23:56
    
@user977506: Making a shallow copy is minor, but even if it wasn't you shouldn't worry about it until profiling has shown that to be a bottleneck. –  Ethan Furman Oct 26 '11 at 2:30
    
ok, thanks again. It works like a charm. –  tst Oct 26 '11 at 14:15

Python and type checks don't go together. Learn to live with it. It's the job of whoever uses the code to pass the proper types. Document what your code expects, but don't check it explicitly.

There are other collections than lists and tuples. Why would you forbid, say, namedtuple? Python is a dynamic language, don't fight it by writing type checks.

Look up EAFP in the Python glossary. Don't try to anticipate errors; deal with them as they happen.


A reasonable thing you might do instead of type checking is converting to a list:

self.__teams = list(tms)

List-incompatible types will cause an exception to be raised on this line, and from now on you can be sure you're dealing with a list. (It won't prevent someone from assigning non-strings to the list, of course.)


Oh, and if you ever (with good reason!) need a type check, use the isinstance function instead of comparing the type(). That will also catch subclasses of whatever your required type is. And more, try to use the most general base type you can. The proper way to test for a string (Unicode or otherwise) is:

if isinstance(my_object, basestring):
    ....

And the proper way to check for a list-like collection – not just a narrow-minded “list or tuple” – is:

import collections
if isinstance(my_object, collections.Sequence):
    ...

But that was just an aside, not the proper solution to your problem. Don't do type checking without good reason.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Petr, you are probably right, there is no point into doing that. –  tst Oct 25 '11 at 19:57
    
Using collections.Sequence will fail if the type is not registered, and since ABC's are optional, there are sure to be many that are not. –  Ethan Furman Oct 25 '11 at 20:34
    
@EthanFurman: Well, yes. Checking ABCs is better than isinstance(..., (list, tuple)) because you can at least use ABCs as a crutch to please the code that does the checks. No checks are, of course better still. –  Petr Viktorin Oct 25 '11 at 21:01
    
(for the record, not all ABCs are optional – isinstance(..., Sized) is true for anything with a __len__) –  Petr Viktorin Oct 25 '11 at 21:02
    
Incorrect -- my dbf class has a __len__ method, and instances of it fail isinstance(..., Sized). –  Ethan Furman Oct 25 '11 at 21:29

This error isn't because you are failing some typecheck.

Unless you have misrepresented your code (it's obviously edited, as what you posted won't run correctly), this is happening because match1.teams[0] calls your getTeams function, not your setTeams function. To see this for yourself, try this exercise:

class match(object):
    __teams=(None,None)
    def setTeams(self,tms):
        print "in set"
        self.__teams = tms
    def getTeams(self):
        print "in get"
        return self.__teams
    teams=property(getTeams,setTeams)

When I try this, I get the following:

>>> match1 = match()
>>> match1.teams[0]=5
in get
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment
>>> match1.teams = ["team1","team2"]
in set
>>> match1.teams[0]=5
in get
share|improve this answer
    
Nate you are right, the get method is used. So Petr is right, I am out of luck. Thank you both. –  tst Oct 25 '11 at 19:56

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