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What if I have a class that both extends an abstract class and implements an interface, for example:

class Example : AbstractExample, ExampleInterface
{
    // class content here
}

How can I initialize this class so I can access methods from both the interface and the abstract class?

When I do:

AbstractExample example = new Example();

I cannot access methods from the interface.

Richard

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The last example will tie you to a solid instance of either the interface or abstract class which I presume is not your goal.The bad news is you're NOT in a dynamically typed language here, so your stuck with either having a reference to a solid "Example" objects as previously sprcified or casting/uncasting i.e:

AbstractExample example = new Example();
((IExampleInterface)example).DoSomeMethodDefinedInInterface();

Your other alternitives are to have both AbstractExample and IExampleInterface implement a common interface so you would have i.e.

abstract class AbstractExample : ICommonInterface
interface IExampleInterface : ICommonInterface
class Example : AbstractExample, IExampleInterface

Now you could work with ICommonInterface and have the functionality of both the abstract class and the implementation of your IExample interface.

If none of these answers are acceptable, you may want to look at some of the DLR languages that run under the .NET framework i.e. IronPython.

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Thank you both of your answers are very useful ;) I'm a little confused with C# because I come from PHP/Zend and it's pretty different language. –  Richard Knop Apr 25 '09 at 19:08
    
Yeah, i think a lot of people came from that background too (me included). You can do things with static languages that aren't possible with dynamic and visa versa. The best thing to do is to understand the difference and see where the line can be blured slightly. .NET 3.5 introduced some great features that make the language "dynamicish", Kent Boogaart's solution is a good start to maybe get the features your looking for without the verbosity of extra interfaces. –  Owen Apr 25 '09 at 19:13
2  
Downvoted. C# is not a dynamically typed language. Also you do not provide the simplest answer, which is Example example = new Example(); –  Paul Batum Apr 27 '09 at 12:04
    
Yeah, C# is most certainly not a dynamically typed language. –  Noldorin May 11 '09 at 11:58
2  
@Paul Batum & @Noldorin: Pure typo and not worth a downvote, simply missed "NOT" off. @Paul Batum - Your missing the point, the posted obviously didn't want a strong dependency with the Example class, hence why he interfaced and abstracted it off. –  Owen May 12 '09 at 19:33
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You need to

  • implement the interface in AbstractExample
  • or get a reference to Example

Example example = new Example();

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If you only know the abstract class, it suggests that you know the actual type via an instance of Type. Therefore, you could use generics:

private T SomeMethod<T>()
    where T : new(), AbstractExample, ExampleInterface
{
    T instance = new T();
    instance.SomeMethodOnAbstractClass();
    instance.SomeMethodOnInterface();
    return instance;
}
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Really like this answer, and now you have my mind racing on how to take this solution further. –  Owen Apr 25 '09 at 19:08
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Use:

Example example = new Example();

Updated after more information:

If you are sure it implements ExampleInterface, you can use

AbstractClass example = new Example();
ExampleInterface exampleInterface = (ExampleInterface)example;
exampleInterface.InterfaceMethod();

You can also make sure it really implements it by checking the interface with

if (example is ExampleInterface) {
    // Cast to ExampleInterface like above and call its methods.
}

I don't believe Generics help you as those are resolved compile time and if you only have a reference to the AbstractClass the compiler will complain.

Edit: So more or less what Owen said. :)

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Thank you. But what if I don't know the reference to the class, I know only which abstract class it extends and which interface it implements? Richard –  Richard Knop Apr 25 '09 at 18:55
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I think this example will help you:

public interface ICrud
{
    void Add();
    void Update();
    void Delete();
    void Select();
}

public abstract class CrudBase
{
    public void Add()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Performing add operation...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

   public void Update()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Performing update operation...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    public void Delete()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Performing delete operation...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    public void Select()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Performing select operation...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
var process = new ProcessData();
process.Add();
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