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I have n classes which either stack or do not stack on top of one another. All these classes extend the same class (CellObject). I know that more classes will be added to this list, and I want to create some kind of way that it is easy to manipulate "stackability" in one place.

I was thinking of creating a matrix, where the row-index is the class on the bottom of the stack and the column index is the class on the top of the stack. The value would be true (or 1) if you can stack top on bottom, false (0) otherwise.

However, my colleague suggests creating n+1 methods called canStack. One general canStack method would switch on an instanceof statement that would direct it into one of the n submethods. Each of the submethods would just answer the question of whether the top object can stack on the bottom object by itself.

I think my solution is more elegant/clean. Is this true? If so, how would I implement it?

I changed objects to classes

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Maybe change the word "objects" to "classes" in your first few sentences. Object implies an instance, but this is about class attributes. –  G_H Oct 25 '11 at 20:30
    
Thank you. Did it. –  BlackSheep Oct 25 '11 at 20:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your solution would be shorter. But it has the drawback that if you add a sublcass of CellObject, you could potentially forget to alter your array. Even if you know this should happen, someone else might some day work on the code. Then again, his solution has that same issue.

Now, this is a slightly wild idea, but since you're essentially saying something about classes it feels like a metadata facility is in order. What you could do is define an annotation that states which classes can be stacked onto the annotated class and/or which classes it can stack on.

Something like this:

@interface Stackable {
    Class<? extends CellObject>[] stackables(); //Classes that may stack on the annotated one
    Class<? extends Cellobject>[] pillars(); //Classes this one can stack on
}

Then you could create an annotation processor that uses this metadata. It could create a configuration file your read in at compile time, or generate some boilerplate code for you. You could generate meta-classes like JPA does for its type-safe query API that say something about the class. Or you could even retain the annotations at runtime to use reflection for finding out what can stack on what, building up your desired array ad-hoc rather than having to code it.

If you use an annotation processor, then maybe it would be safer to use String arrays with canonical class names, since the Class objects might not be available yet at compile time. Its feasibility would also depend on whether all CellObject classes are always in the same compilation run or not.

Using reflection (possible when making sure the annotation has a RetentionType RUNTIME) seems like a viable option here. Check the array; if the corresponding element is null (can be done by using Boolean instead of boolean), do the reflection stuff and fill in that element. Next time you can avoid the reflection overhead, lazily filling the array as needed.

EDIT: forgot to mention, my solution doesn't enforce you to keep the metadata up-to-date either. Also, the complexity could be reduced if the stackability is transitive. That is, A can stack on B and B can stack on C implies A can stack on C.

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Nice solution, thank you. –  BlackSheep Oct 25 '11 at 21:02
    
Ah, one more thing. Might be best to use a (Hash)Map that represents the matrix using the (qualified) class names instead of Class objects. Keeping Class objects in a collection can lead to nasty classloader leaks. –  G_H Oct 25 '11 at 21:09

The matrix approach would scale as O(n2). In contrast, the other approach would scale as O(n), but it would be riskier to maintain.

As an alternative, consider letting an abstract CellObject implement a suitable Stackable interface, but defer the implementation to the n concrete subclass. the compiler will identify missing implementations immediately. See also When an Abstract Class Implements an Interface.

interface Stackable {

    boolean canStack(Stackable other);
}

abstract class CellObject implements Stackable {}

class Cell01 extends CellObject {

    @Override
    public boolean canStack(Stackable other) {
        return true; // TODO
    }
}

class Cell02 extends CellObject {

    @Override
    public boolean canStack(Stackable other) {
        return true; // TODO
    }
}
...
share|improve this answer
    
Thought about that as well. The thing is, this works on instances rather than on the Class objects. Maybe the poster really does need the info for the Classes rather than instances. But if the info will end up being used with instanceof or getClass() or the like, then your approach may as well be used. –  G_H Oct 25 '11 at 21:54
    
I sense the poster really needed your meta-solution. –  trashgod Oct 25 '11 at 22:01
    
Annotations are the new XML. Slap them onto everything like sprinkles on ice cream. Or better yet... generate XML from annotations! It's what I do. –  G_H Oct 25 '11 at 22:08

I don't think your matrix concept would be the good way to achieve your goal. You'll end up with a huge matrix that contains every possibilities. Obviously, extracting the information you wish from the matrix will be fairly easy, but maintaining it in the long run might prove to be a painful experience as more CellObject subclasses are being added. The same applies to the n + 1 methods your colleague suggested.

In both cases, everytime you will add a subblass of CellObject, you will have to either go to the class that holds the matrix, create a new row, and a new column for each existing row, and manually specify if this new class can be stacked or not on class x, or add a new method canStackOnNewClassX () to each existing class. Both solutions are bug prone in my opinion (you might easily forget to update your matrix, or enter the wrong information as the code might not be easily readable), there are more elegant ways to handle such kind of problem.

One thing you could do is have a map in your CellObject super class that will hold on your "stackability" information, and provide methods to populate this map and to retrieve if a member of class A can be stacked on a member of class B. Something like this:

public abstract class CellObject
    {
    private static Map<Class<? extends CellObject>, Map<Class<? extends CellObject>, Boolean>> fullStackabilityMap = 
            new HashMap<Class<? extends CellObject>, Map<Class<? extends CellObject>, Boolean>> ();

    protected static void addStackableOnObjectInformation (Class<? extends CellObject> baseObjectClass, Class<? extends CellObject> objectToStack, boolean canStackOnObject)
        {
        Map<Class<? extends CellObject>, Boolean> stackableMapForObject = fullStackabilityMap.get (baseObjectClass);

        if (stackableMapForObject == null)
            {
            stackableMapForObject = new HashMap<Class<? extends CellObject>, Boolean> ();
            fullStackabilityMap.put (baseObjectClass, stackableMapForObject);
            }

        stackableMapForObject.put (objectToStack, canStackOnObject);
        }

    protected boolean isStackableOnObject (CellObject baseObject)
        {
        Map<Class<? extends CellObject>, Boolean> stackableMapForObject = CellObject.fullStackabilityMap.get (baseObject.getClass ());

        if (stackableMapForObject == null)
            {
            return false;
            }

        Boolean canStackOnObject = stackableMapForObject.get (this.getClass ());
        return canStackOnObject != null ? canStackOnObject : false;  //Assume that the object cannot be stacked if it was not specified
        }
    }

public class CellObjectA extends CellObject
    {
    }

public class CellObjectB extends CellObject
    {
    static
        {
        addStackableOnObjectInformation (CellObjectB.class, CellObjectA.class, true);
        }
    }

public class CellObjectC extends CellObject
    {
    static 
        {
        addStackableOnObjectInformation (CellObjectC.class, CellObjectA.class, true);
        addStackableOnObjectInformation (CellObjectC.class, CellObjectB.class, true);
        }
    }

The creation of fullStackabilityMap in CellObject seems complicated, due to Java's lack of diamond operator in Java 6, but it could be simplified if you wrote a utility method that creates maps, or use Guava.

So, in this example, CellObjectC instances would not be stackable over kind of objects; CellObjectB instances could be stacked on CellObjectC objects only, and CellObjectA could be stacked on either CellObjectB or CellObjectC objects.

The only work you would have to do each time you add a new class is to update the static initializers of your existing classes to make sure this new class is accounted for. The advantages of this solution are:

  • You only have to specify which kind of object can be stacked on which kind of object. No need to fully initialize a matrix with all possibilities.
  • You can ask an object directly if it can be stacked on any kind of object, rather than having to statically poll an external class, which to me is easier to maintain, and generates cleaner code.
  • You do not have to maintain n+1 methods that will tell you with object A can be stacked on object B, which would be a total nightmare if you end up with a significant number of CellObject subclasses.
share|improve this answer
    
Good solution. What I suggested more or less boils down to the same, but the work of the static initializers is offloaded to some utility class that would inspect the annotations. Your approach is simpler to understand from a code perspective, while annotations might be more intuitive to use. Either way, it remains essential that some specification of JavaDoc makes it very clear CellObject classes must provide the stackability info. –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 8:31

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