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Here is my current problem: I am trying to create a file of x MB in C++. The user will enter in the file name then enter in a number between 5 and 10 for the size of the file they want created. Later on in this project i'm gonna do other things with it but I'm stuck on the first step of creating the darn thing.

My problem code (so far):

        char empty[1024];
        for(int i = 0; i < 1024; i++)
        {
            empty[i] = 0;
        }

        fileSystem = fopen(argv[1], "w+");


        for(int i = 0; i < 1024*fileSize; i++){
            int temp = fputs(empty, fileSystem);
            if(temp > -1){
                //Sucess!
            }
            else{
                cout<<"error"<<endl;
            }
        }

Now if i'm doing my math correctly 1 char is 1byte. There are 1024 bytes in 1KB and 1024KB in a MB. So if I wanted a 2 MB file, i'd have to write 1024*1024*2 bytes to this file. Yes?

I don't encounter any errors but I end up with an file of 0 bytes... I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong here so any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

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2  
How do you think fputs knows how many bytes to write? –  Charles Bailey Oct 25 '11 at 21:21
    
fwrite, or seek/putc('0') will be your easiest bet. –  Mooing Duck Oct 25 '11 at 21:24
    
Don't forget to handle errors (e.g. check argc) –  sehe Oct 25 '11 at 21:31
1  
@MooingDuck: I think the teacher will take a red marker, and correct putc('0') into putc(0) or putc('\0'). At which time, the student should take the red marker, and strongly cross out the ++ signs appearing in the name of this course :) –  sehe Oct 25 '11 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is what things would look like in actual c++

Edit Here is a way shorter variant that does functionally the same (sample creates output.img of 300Mb):

#include <fstream>

int main()
{
    std::ofstream ofs("ouput.img", std::ios::binary | std::ios::out);
    ofs.seekp((300<<20) - 1);
    ofs.write("", 1);
}

Note that technically, this will be a good way to trigger your filesystem's support for sparse files.


#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<char> empty(1024, 0);
    std::ofstream ofs("ouput.img", std::ios::binary | std::ios::out);

    for(int i = 0; i < 1024*300; i++)
    {
        if (!ofs.write(&empty[0], empty.size()))
        {
            std::cerr << "problem writing to file" << std::endl;
            return 255;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Added a three line solution that will save space by making a sparse file. –  sehe Oct 25 '11 at 21:30
    
This works, but I don't understand the 20 in the ofs.seekp((300<<20)-1); I understand that it gets you to the size-1 position to write your empty character, but what does the 300<<20 operator do? –  OmegaTwig Oct 25 '11 at 22:13
2  
<< is the bitwise shift-left operation. Shifting binary numbers left by one bit is equivalent to multiplying by 2. So shifting left by 10 bits is equivalent to multiplying by 1024 (2**10). It is a convenient shorthand in absense of C++11 userdefined literals like 300Mb –  sehe Oct 25 '11 at 22:17
    
Thanks! Totally forgot about bit shifting :S –  OmegaTwig Oct 26 '11 at 11:41

Your code doesn't work because you are using fputs which writes a null-terminated string into the output buffer. But you are trying to write all nulls, so it stops right when it looks at the first byte of your string and ends up writing nothing.

Now, to create a file of a specific size, all you need to do is to call truncate function (or _chsiz for Windows) exactly once and set what size you want the file to be.

Good luck!

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To make a 2MB file you have to seek to 2*1024*1024 and write 0 bytes. fput()ting empty string will do no good no matter how many time. And the string is empty, because strings a 0-terminated.

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