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I am working with a user control that has set of javascript functions that are called when an action is performed. This user control is used in a lot of places in the application.

When one of the inbuilt JS function completes execution, I need to fire a custom JS function on my page.

Is there a way for me to attach a function to be fired when another function completes execution? I don't want to update the inbuilt JS function to call this page JS function.

Hope this makes sense.

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What do you mean by "inbuilt"? –  lwburk Oct 25 '11 at 21:24
    
Is that built-in function asynchronous by any chance? If so, does it accept a callback? –  pimvdb Oct 25 '11 at 21:24
    
By inbuilt, i simply mean that this function is a part of a JS file that's used by this user control (ASP.NET) –  Nick Oct 25 '11 at 21:26
    
@pimvdb : No it's not async –  Nick Oct 25 '11 at 21:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are a couple design patterns you could use for this depending upon the specific code (which you have not shared) and what you can and cannot change:

Option 1: Add a callback to some existing code:

function mainFunction(callbackWhenDone) {
    // do other stuff here
    callbackWhenDone();
}

So, you can call this with:

mainFunction(myFunction);

Option 2: Wrap previous function:

obj.oldMethod = obj.mainFunction;
obj.mainFunction = function() {
    this.oldMethod.apply(this, arguments);
    // call your stuff here after executing the old method
    myFunction();
}

So, now anytime someone does:

obj.mainFunction();

it will call the original method and then call your function.

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You're basically trying to do callbacks. Since you're not mentioning what functions you're talking about (as in code), the best thing to do would be basically to wrap the function, -quick and dirty- and make it work with callbacks.

That way you can pass it a Lambda (Anonymous Function) and execute anything you want when it's done.

Updated to demonstrate how to add Callbacks:

function my_function($a, $callback) {
   alert($a);
   $callback();
}

my_function('argument', function() { 
  alert('Completed');
});
share|improve this answer
    
The functions are plain JS functions. Do you happen to have an example of how to implement callbacks in JS/Jquery –  Nick Oct 25 '11 at 21:27
    
The inbuilt function doesn't accept callbacks :( –  Nick Oct 25 '11 at 21:28
    
Added a simple example. –  MarioRicalde Oct 25 '11 at 21:30
    
Please make sure that also the function is not returning a value after it's complete, that could also be a nice way to implement it. –  MarioRicalde Oct 25 '11 at 21:31

The ugliest and best solution is to monkey-patch the built-in function. Assume the built-in function is called "thirdParty":

// first, store a ref to the original
var copyOfThirdParty = thirdParty;
// then, redefine it
var thirdParty = function() {
    // call the original first (passing any necessary args on through)
    copyOfThirdParty.apply(this, arguments);
    // then do whatever you want when it's done; 
    // custom code goes here
    customFunction();
};

We've essentially created a modified version of the built-in function without ever touching the original version.

share|improve this answer

Since Javascript is highly dynamic you can modify the original function without modifying its source code:

function connect_after(before, after){
    return function(){
        before.apply(this, arguments);
        after();
    };
}

var original_function = function(){ console.log(1); }
original_function = connect_after(original_function, function(){ console.log(2); })
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