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I found a threadpool which doesn't seem to be in boost yet, but I may be able to use it for now (unless there is a better solution).

I have several million small tasks that I want to execute concurrently and I wanted to use a threadpool to schedule the execution of the tasks. The documentation of the threadpool provides (roughly) this example:

#include "threadpool.hpp"
using namespace boost::threadpool;

// A short task
void task()
{
    // do some work
}

void execute_with_threadpool(int poolSize, int numTasks)
{
    // Create a thread pool.
    pool tp(poolSize);

    for(int i = 0; i++; i < numTasks)
    {
        // Add some tasks to the pool.
        tp.schedule(&task);
    }
    // Leave this function and wait until all tasks are finished.
}

However, the example only allows me to schedule non-member functions (or tasks). Is there a way that I can schedule a member function for execution?

Update:

OK, supposedly the library allows you to schedule a Runnable for execution, but I can't figure out where is the Runnable class that I'm supposed to inherit from.

template<typename Pool, typename Runnable>
bool schedule(Pool& pool, shared_ptr<Runnable> const & obj);

Update2:

I think I found out what I need to do: I have to make a runnable which will take any parameters that would be necessary (including a reference to the object that has a function which will be called), then I use the static schedule function to schedule the runnable on the given threadpool:

class Runnable
{
private:
    MyClass* _target;
    Data* _data;
public:
    Runnable(MyClass* target, Data* data)
    {
        _target = target;
        _data = data;
    }

    ~Runnable(){}

    void run()
    {
        _target->doWork(_data);
    }
};

Here is how I schedule it within MyClass:

void MyClass::doWork(Data* data)
{
    // do the work
}

void MyClass::produce()
{
    boost::threadpool::schedule(myThreadPool, boost::shared_ptr<Runnable>(new Runnable(myTarget, new Data())));
}

However, the adaptor from the library has a bug in it:

template<typename Pool, typename Runnable>
bool schedule(Pool& pool, shared_ptr<Runnable> const & obj)
{ 
    return pool->schedule(bind(&Runnable::run, obj));
} 

Note that it takes a reference to a Pool but it tries to call it as if it was a pointer to a Pool, so I had to fix that too (just changing the -> to a .).

share|improve this question
    
Not that it has anything to do with answering the question, but why do so many threads in parallel? Is there a practical application? I've worked with massively parallel systems with 4096+ CPUs, but the i/o problem becomes a significant hurdle well short of that. –  wallyk Oct 25 '11 at 21:51
    
I'm able to read about 130k records/sec from disk and I have to deserialize each record. Deserialization takes so much time that if I try to do it in a single thread, my i/o throughput falls to about 6k records/sec. I'm working on optimizing my deserialization, but I also want to increase the number of threads that are deserializing records as I'm reading them from disk. In other words: I want i/o to be the problem, not the serialization. –  Lirik Oct 25 '11 at 21:58
    
you're going to use multithreading library that even cannot be compiled w/o fixes? multithreading bugs are often subtle and can appear long ago after testing. my best recommendation is to throw it away and use something that is well tested. or at least check that you use the latest version, because online documentation describes different interface, that doesn't use any Runnable (smells like Java-like thing) –  Andy T Oct 26 '11 at 18:58
    
@Andy, I get the point about using a tried and tested library and I'm contemplating on doing that. However, this library does indeed want to use a runnable. And I don't mind the Java smell as long as it works, but it doesn't! –  Lirik Oct 26 '11 at 19:47

3 Answers 3

To schedule any function or member function - use Boost.Bind or Boost.Lambda (in this order). Also you can consider special libraries for your situation. I can recommend Inter Threading Building Blocks or, in case you use VC2010 - Microsoft Parallel Patterns Library.

EDIT:

I've never used this library or heard anything bad about it, but it's old enough and still is not included into Boost. I would check why.

EDIT 2:

Another option - Boost.Asio. It's primarily a networking library, but it has a scheduler that you can use. I would use this multithreading approach. Just instead of using asynchronous network operations schedule your tasks by boost::asio::io_service::post().

share|improve this answer
    
I think I found the solution... see my last update for more info. –  Lirik Oct 25 '11 at 22:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I found out what I need to do: I have to make a runnable which will take any parameters that would be necessary (including a reference to the object that has a function which will be called), then I use the static schedule function to schedule the runnable on the given threadpool:

class Runnable
{
private:
    MyClass* _target;
    Data* _data;
public:
    Runnable(MyClass* target, Data* data)
    {
        _target = target;
        _data = data;
    }

    ~Runnable(){}

    void run()
    {
        _target->doWork(_data);
    }
};

Here is how I schedule it within MyClass:

void MyClass::doWork(Data* data)
{
    // do the work
}

void MyClass::produce()
{
    boost::threadpool::schedule(myThreadPool, boost::shared_ptr<Runnable>(new Runnable(myTarget, new Data())));
}

However, the adaptor from the library has a bug in it:

template<typename Pool, typename Runnable>
bool schedule(Pool& pool, shared_ptr<Runnable> const & obj)
{ 
    return pool->schedule(bind(&Runnable::run, obj));
} 

Note that it takes a reference to a Pool but it tries to call it as if it was a pointer to a Pool, so I had to fix that too (just changing the -> to a .).

However, as it turns out, I can't use that boost thread pool because I am mixing native C++ (dll), C++/CLI (dll) and .NET code: I have a C++/CLI library that wraps a native C++ library which in tern uses boost::thread. Unfortunately, that results in a BadImageFormatException at runtime (which has previously been discussed by other people):

The problem is that the static boost thread library tries to hook the native win32 PE TLS callbacks in order to ensure that the thread-local data used by boost thread is cleaned up correctly. This is not compatible with a C++/CLI executable.

share|improve this answer
    
.Net has its own thread pool capabilities. Might as well use those. –  Logan Capaldo Oct 28 '11 at 12:40
    
@Logan, sorry, I wasn't clear enough: I need the thread pool inside the native C++ library. The .NET Thread Pool will not help me in that case. –  Lirik Oct 28 '11 at 12:52
    
No you were clear, I didn't read carefully enough :). –  Logan Capaldo Oct 28 '11 at 13:02

This solution is what I was able to implement using the information: http://think-async.com/Asio/Recipes. I tried implementing this recipe and found that the code worked in Windows but not in Linux. I was unable to figure out the problem but searching the internet found the key which was make the work object an auto pointer within the code block. I've include the void task() that the user wanted for my example I was able to create a convenience function and pass pointers into my function does the work. For my case, I create a thread pool that uses the function : boost::thread::hardware_concurrency() to get the possible number of threads. I've used the recipe below with as many as 80 tasks with 15 threads.

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/scoped_ptr.hpp>

// A short task
void task()
{
    // do some work
}

void execute_with_threadpool( int numTasks, 
                              int poolSize = boost::thread::hardware_concurrency() )
{
    boost::asio::io_service io_service;
    boost::thread_group threads;
    {
        boost::scoped_ptr< boost::asio::io_service::work > work( new boost::asio::io_service::work(io_service) );

        for(int t = 0; t < poolSize; t++)
        {
            threads.create_thread(boost::bind(&boost::asio::io_service::run, &io_service));
        }

        for( size_t t = 0; t < numTasks; t++ )
        {
            ++_number_of_jobs;
            io_service.post(boost::bind(task) );
        }
    }
    threads.join_all();

}
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to reference this link for the fix to the original Asio Recipe: gist.github.com/snaewe/1393807 –  DannyK Dec 30 '13 at 17:26
    
A another reference I used: thisthread.blogspot.com/2011/04/multithreading-with-asio.html –  DannyK Dec 30 '13 at 17:34

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