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I've a vote system which is designed like this:

CREATE TABLE `vote` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `weight` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `submited_date` datetime NOT NULL,
  `resource_type` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=2963832 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE `article_preselection_vote` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `article_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `user_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `IDX_9B145DEA62922701` (`article_id`),
  KEY `IDX_9B145DEAA76ED395` (`user_id`),
  CONSTRAINT `article_preselection_vote_ibfk_4` FOREIGN KEY (`article_id`) REFERENCES `article` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `article_preselection_vote_ibfk_5` FOREIGN KEY (`id`) REFERENCES `vote` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `article_preselection_vote_ibfk_6` FOREIGN KEY (`user_id`) REFERENCES `user` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

v.weight can be +1 or -1, I need, given a bunch of articles ID, to get the sum of each positive vote (+1) and the sum of negative vote (-1) per articles id.

Then my result should be

article_id | vote_up | vote_down
-----------|---------|----------
    1      |    36   |     20
-----------|---------|----------
    68     |    12   |     56
-----------|---------|----------
    25     |    90   |     12
-----------|---------|----------

I can get that result by doing the following request, but it's quite heavy and slow on 2,000,000 votes.

SELECT apv.article_id, COALESCE(SUM(up),0) as up, COALESCE(SUM(down),0) as down 
FROM article_preselection_vote apv 
LEFT JOIN(
    SELECT id, weight up FROM vote WHERE weight > 0 AND vote.resource_type = 'article') v1 ON apv.id = v1.id 
LEFT JOIN(
    SELECT id, weight down FROM vote WHERE weight < 0 AND vote.resource_type = 'article') v2 ON apv.id = v2.id 
WHERE apv.article_id IN (11702,11703,11704,11632,11652,11658)
GROUP BY apv.article_id

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try a single join:

SELECT
    apv.article_id,
    SUM(COALESCE(weight, 0) > 0) AS up,
    SUM(COALESCE(weight, 0) < 0) AS down 
FROM article_preselection_vote apv 
LEFT JOIN vote
    ON apv.id = vote.id
    AND vote.resource_type = 'article'
WHERE apv.article_id IN (11702, 11703, 11704, 11632, 11652, 11658)
GROUP BY apv.article_id

If you need to calculate this often it might be worthwhile to denormalize your database and store a cached copy of the results.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, I'll give it a try, thanks for your suggestion too, however I'm using an ORM so I can't really denormalize my schema, btw, I need "realtime" result, will be worth any anyway to use a cache table? – Trent Oct 25 '11 at 22:28
    
You could try updating the cached results using triggers. – Mark Byers Oct 25 '11 at 22:30
    
I just tried your query but I got 0,0 for each sums, however it's pretty fast : ) – Trent Oct 25 '11 at 22:31
    
(if anyone can remove my previous comment...) it actually works and is pretty fast, an explain on that queries show only 19 rows (well I don't have much votes right now, but a test on another db shows 14500 on 2,000,000 so it's pretty acceptable I guess. thanks – Trent Oct 25 '11 at 22:41

Subselects, IN (...) and GROUP BY in one query are killers.

You should redesign to have a more traditional solution:

  1. Have a table with the votes article_id, votes_up, votes_down, vote_date, ...
  2. Update (cron) the summary fields in your article table votes_up, votes_down, ... with one UPDATE.

That way, you can better handle the row/table locks and have fast queries

share|improve this answer
1  
hi, actually it is what we already do for classic votes, however, such vote need to be realtime because they're used to "preselect" articles, so I can't just run a cron to update a column in my article table, but thanks for your suggestions – Trent Oct 25 '11 at 22:33

Instead of weighting the votes, why don't you just create two tables, one for up votes and one for down votes? The only thing it will complicate is vote combination, which will still be a simple sum of the counts of two different queries.

share|improve this answer

in a nut shell do something like this:

select * from article where article_id in (1,2,3);
+------------+-----------+---------------+-----------------+
| article_id | title     | up_vote_count | down_vote_count |
+------------+-----------+---------------+-----------------+
|          1 | article 1 |             2 |               3 |
|          2 | article 2 |             2 |               1 |
|          3 | article 3 |             1 |               1 |
+------------+-----------+---------------+-----------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)


drop table if exists article;
create table article
(
article_id int unsigned not null auto_increment primary key,
title varchar(255) not null,
up_vote_count int unsigned not null default 0,
down_vote_count int unsigned not null default 0
)
engine = innodb;

drop table if exists article_vote;
create table article_vote
(
article_id int unsigned not null,
user_id int unsigned not null,
score tinyint not null default 0,
primary key (article_id, user_id)
)
engine=innodb;

delimiter #

create trigger article_vote_after_ins_trig after insert on article_vote
for each row
begin
 if new.score < 0 then
  update article set down_vote_count = down_vote_count + 1 where article_id = new.article_id;
 else
  update article set up_vote_count = up_vote_count + 1 where article_id = new.article_id;
 end if;
end#

delimiter ;

insert into article (title) values ('article 1'),('article 2'), ('article 3');

insert into article_vote (article_id, user_id, score) values
(1,1,-1),(1,2,-1),(1,3,-1),(1,4,1),(1,5,1),
(2,1,1),(2,2,1),(2,3,-1),
(3,1,1),(3,5,-1);

select * from article where article_id in (1,2,3);
share|improve this answer

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