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What do I do with this switch-case statement in C?

#if defined MY_CONST && define RUN_TEST
    case TX_ERROR:
        //code here
        break;
    case RX_ERROR:
        //other code here
        break;
#endif

I'm coding in an existing project, and I see the above lines in an included header file (in the file I'm working on). No mention of a "switch" anywhere else in the header file!

I've never seen this before! How can these be case switches without the switching? Since this must be possible, how can I use these cases in a switch statement in my main file?

Sorry if this is a n00b question, I'm fairly new to C and even newer to compiler directives...

Thanks!

EDIT: I can't post the actual file (code base under licence?), but here's a stripped version:

#if defined _CONFIG
    #define MY_CONST
    #define MY_INIT
    #define RUN_TEST

    static void fnInit(void);
    static void fnGo(void);
#endif

#if defined MY_CONST && define RUN_TEST
    case TX_ERROR:
        //code here
        break;
    case RX_ERROR:
        //other code here
        break;
#endif

#if defined MY_INIT && defined MY_CONST
static void fnInit(void)
{
    //code
}

static void fnGo(void)
{
    //code
}
#endif
share|improve this question
2  
What is around it? –  Brendan Long Oct 26 '11 at 0:04
3  
Is that the entire content of the header file? Perhaps its meant to be #included from within a switch. –  K-ballo Oct 26 '11 at 0:04
    
There's other #ifdefs in the header too, one of them having two functions defined inside! Having the #include in a switch makes sense, but then how would it handle the functions?? –  RaytheonLiszt Oct 26 '11 at 0:13
    
Can we just see the file? –  Brendan Long Oct 26 '11 at 0:14
    
@BrendanLong Updated Question. Thanks –  RaytheonLiszt Oct 26 '11 at 0:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make sure that MY_CONST is never defined!

If what you quote is accurate, then you'd have to include the header in the scope of a switch statement for the result with MY_CONST defined to make any sense. If it is not embedded in a macro, then it is basically an accident waiting to happen.


With the revised content, make sure that you never have both MY_CONST and RUN_TEST defined. There is no way for the header to be used sanely if they are -- not even if you are using GCC and have nested functions enabled.

Fundamentally, that fragment is a bug in the header.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I knew it looked weird... –  RaytheonLiszt Oct 27 '11 at 0:24

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