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I'm just wondering why I get this output :

enum MyEnum
{
    a=1,
    b=2,
    c=3,
    d=3,
    f=d
}
Console.WriteLine(MyEnum.f.ToString());

OUTPUT
c


But in Mono
OUTPUT
f

So why is the output c? not d? How does the compiler choose c? If I change the code like this:

enum MyEnum
{
    a=1,
    b=2,
    c=3,
    d=3, 
    k=3
}
Console.WriteLine(MyEnum.k.ToString());


OUTPUT
c
again!

Another example:

enum MyEnum
{
    a=3,
    b=3,
    c=3,      
    d=3,
    f=d,   
}
MessageBox.Show(MyEnum.f.ToString());

OUTPUT
c

share|improve this question
1  
very good question, i wonder myself as well. perhaps because it's first? –  Zhanger Oct 26 '11 at 0:20
2  
Just to be sure: you do know that you've assigned "c" the value of 3 also...? –  Reddog Oct 26 '11 at 0:20
    
i dont have any idea,maybe becouse of its first but i want to dig in deep –  Mustafa Ekici Oct 26 '11 at 0:22
1  
+1 good question, I'm waiting to know the motive. –  The Mask Oct 26 '11 at 0:23
    
Did you test it on Mono ? It sounds true behavior of compiler. In your first example, I got f instead of c –  minhcat_vo Apr 20 '13 at 9:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 36 down vote accepted

From MSDN:

If multiple enumeration members have the same underlying value and you attempt to retrieve the string representation of an enumeration member's name based on its underlying value, your code should not make any assumptions about which name the method will return.

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a0h36syw.aspx#Y300

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for explaining :D +1 –  Zhanger Oct 26 '11 at 0:27
9  
The apparent randomness in which enumeration name is selected is because ToString() for an enumeration without a [Flags] attribute uses a binary search to find the first enumeration name with the specified value efficiently. –  Rick Sladkey Oct 26 '11 at 1:41

The output is c because ToString resolves the index of the enum and prints out the representation at that index. In the first example, d=3, and the third indexed enum value is c. Similarly, when looking for the third index for k, it arrives at c before k, so that is again the output.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem accurate. This enum MyEnum {a=1,b=2,c=3,d=2,f=d} , according to your explanation, should print b and it prints f –  Icarus Oct 26 '11 at 0:30
    
Technically it doesn't really index like that. It just so happens that the first name that the methods see that has the same value turns out to be c. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 26 '11 at 0:32
2  
That's not how it works.. it just happened to be the case in this example. Try a=3, b=3, c=7, d=3, f=d. Prints out f. Set c=2, and it prints out d. –  Rob Oct 26 '11 at 0:37

protected by MarcinJuraszek Apr 20 '13 at 10:38

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