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I'm trying to check whether a string exists in an array in as little lines as possible example:

string foo[] = {blah,blahhh,blahhhh}
string bar = "blah";

if (bar in foo){
cout << "true";
}else {
cout << "false";
}
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1  
Have made the title more descriptive. Feel free to correct it if I got the language wrong, though. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 0:24
1  
There is none. In part, because JavaScript's in is not doing what you believe it is doing, as evidenced by it being used wrong ;-) Ask what is really desired -- no need to bring another language into it. I was going to re-word the question but I would have to throw it out and start over. –  user166390 Oct 26 '11 at 0:38
    
Good spot. in looks for keys, not values. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 1:39
    
lol if you really want to know the specific language basing that off ...its GScript ....a NPC language for a game called graal : "in tests if an array contains a variable (like if (2 in {1,2,3}) ...)" I do believe delphi,java use it in a similar way.... –  sdadasads sadasd Oct 26 '11 at 6:13
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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is not this keyword nor this construct in C++. You have to do a loop or use the find function.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/find/

For other people that try to do the same thing (since is a question a lot of people asked to me in the past) : char arrays and string literals (that are const char arrays) cannot be compared with equality or with built-in operators : comparing two char literals is the same as comparing two pointers. You can however use the std::string type or use old C style functions like strcmp.

If you really want to avoid writing too much lines of code just write another function with more lines and call it with one line. You then can put it in a nice header file and include it when you need :)

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

template<typename T, size_t N>
inline bool arraycontains(const T (&array)[N], const T& value)
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        if (array[i] == value)
            return true;
    return false;
}

int main()
{
    string foo[] = { "blah", "blahhh", "blahhhh" };
    string bar = "blah";

    cout << (arraycontains(foo, bar) ? "true" : "false");
    return 0;
}

If you instead of an array have a pointer you should use a function where u can pass size as a parameter.

Now, if you array is really big, i don't think you would like to use an O(n) linear search into an array, in that case I know you would prefer to use std::map or std::hash_map (note that hash_map is not available in all versions of the STL).

std::map uses internally a Red Black Tree (or an AVL tree, depending on the implementation), so lookup operation is O(log n) worst case, faster than O(n).

std::hash_map instead uses internally an hashtable, giving a worst case complexity O(n) but an average complexity of O(1), very fast in real world applications.

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If you're already using a template, why not deduce the array size, too? And templates are already kind of inline; let the compiler figure it out. template <typename T, size_t N> bool arraycontains(const T (&array)[N], const T& value) { } –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 1:37
    
Oh, and please don't propagate this horrid cin.get() hack! It's not the job of this program to trick the surrounding environment into behaving as desired. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 1:38
    
Thanks for the comments! Corrected as suggested! –  Salvatore Previti Oct 26 '11 at 1:45
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No built-in operator. C++ is more low-level than, say, Javascript, so you have to build these things yourself.

Fortunately, the standard library provides algorithms with which to do the job.

Using C++11 ranges to obtain the start and end of your C-style array:

std::string foo[] = {"lol", "stack", "overflow"};
std::string bar   = "stack";

if (std::find(std::begin(foo), std::end(foo), bar) != std::end(foo))
   found();
else
   not_found();

Without these ranges, provide the start and end of the array manually:

std::string foo[] = {"lol", "stack", "overflow"};
std::string bar   = "stack";

if (std::find(foo, foo+3, bar) != foo+3)
   found();
else
   not_found();

Or, better yet, use a vector (and I've used C++11 initialisation here):

std::vector<std::string> foo{"lol", "stack", "overflow"};
std::string bar = "stack";

if (std::find(foo.begin(), foo.end(), bar) != foo.end())
   found();
else
   not_found();

^ I believe that this will also work for std::array/boost::array, the more direct analogue to your example with a C-style array.

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No operator. You have to use a function to look for it. Either write it yourself (going through the members of your C-style array), or use STL containers and algorithms.

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...or the Standard Library equivalents, like the ones you linked to! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 0:27
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Use a for loop, with a break statement when the string is found.

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You should use std::find, which is simpler to use for standard containers, but works non the less with plain arrays:

string *end = foo + sizeof foo/sizeof *foo;
if (std::find( foo, end, bar ) != end) {
   std::cout << "found";
} else {
   std::cout << "not found";
}

If you were using a proper container, as std::vector, you could use:

if ( std::find( foo.begin(), foo.end(), bar ) != foo.end() )

Which removes a bit of the magic from the array problem.

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In C and C++ there really isn't a specific keyword(?) to "in"

probably the simplest way is to make a loop like this

bool isInsideArray = false; //by default isInsideArray is false
for (int counter = 0;counter>(sizeof(foo)/sizeof(foo[0]));counter++) //find the amount of elements in the array by finding the size of the whole array divided by the size of one element
{
  if (foo[counter] == bar) // check if bar is equal to the current foo element
  {
    isInsideArray = true; //set isInsideArray to true
    break; // break from the loop so we don't do any unnessecary procceessing
  }
}
if(isInsideArray) // if bar was encountered inside foo
{
  //code to be done if bar is inside foo
}
else // isInsideArray equals false
{
  //otherwise
}

this loops through each element of the array and checks if it's equal to bar if so set a flag to true and exit

if the flag is set to true do this (referring to the code inside the if statement)

otherwise do this (referring to code inside the else statement)

this is (from what I know... the simplest method)

hope this helps

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Are string objects always the same size in the array so you can use sizeof(foo)/sizeof(foo[0])? –  CuddleBunny Oct 26 '11 at 0:45
    
@CuddleBunny, what do you mean... that's exactly what is in my code –  luckyl Nov 9 '11 at 3:00
    
I mean if you have an array { "dog", "pickle", "cat" }, if you get the sizeof "dog" does it matter if "pickle" is bigger? –  CuddleBunny Nov 28 '11 at 20:55
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C++ is lacking in operators like that; you would have to do something like:

bool containsBar = false;
for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    if(foo[i] == bar) { // need to use strcmp or something here, just put == for simplicity.
        cout << "true";
        containsBar = true;
        break;
    }
}
if(!containsBar)
    cout << "false";
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Note: the direct analogue would require that you break in the success condition. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 0:32
    
break isn't really required, but of course it is always nice for performance reasons. On the chance that bar is the first element in a gigantic array, you could save a lot of time. I added it to the post. –  CuddleBunny Oct 26 '11 at 0:42
1  
It's required to maintain the semantics of the OP's program, where cout << "true" is executed only once when multiple matches are found. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 26 '11 at 0:49
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