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In UML2.3 superstructure document, section 7.3.42 ParameterDirectionKind, there is a Description for the enumeration of the literal values:

in/inout/out/return

It is easy to understand "in" and "inout" from implementation perspective.

In C++ for example, "in" can be implemented in two ways:

foo( CString strParam )
bar( const CString& strParam )

"inout" can be also implemented in two ways: (reference & pointer)

foo( CString* pParam )
bar( CString& strParam)

Now comes to my question:

  1. What does "return" mean? (I'm talking about "return" direction for a parameter, not return type for an operation/method)

    Are there any language support this direction of parameter? What is the code looks like.

    If no language support it, how to use it conventionally?

  2. What is the difference between "return" and "out"?

  3. Any implementation code for "out" direction of a parameter?

In my opinion, whenever we are talking about a parameter, there must be a caller call this function with an argument assigned to the parameter. Is this statement correct?

Then based on the parameter's direction, it could be in/inout/out/return. My question is: what does "return" direction mean? There must be a reason for the OMG to put this type in the document that I did not figure out.

From UML2.3 Superstructure 7.3.42

return:Indicates that parameter values are passed as return values from a behavioral element back to the caller.

Thank you in advance

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

in UML, the "return parameter" is what is returned and can have only one. Think of it from the perspective of being inside the method (not from the perspective of real life language design as you know it). The return parameter is what the entity passes to what invoked it.

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This is what UML superstructure stated: return: Indicates that parameter values are passed as return values from a behavioral element back to the caller. –  milesma Oct 26 '11 at 2:28
    
Exactly what I said. If you are confused by them being called "parameters", don't. UML was not designed to be language-centric. Just because you're accustomed to languages "returning" values to be assigned to things on the left side of an equal sign, don't skew your perception of what that thing being passed actually is. It is a parameter (for the assignment operation that follows, if you will). –  MartyTPS Oct 26 '11 at 2:33
    
Thank you Marty. In my opinion, whenever we are talking about a parameter, there must be a caller call this function with an argument assigned to the parameter. Is this statement correct? If yes, then what is the argument like to bind to a "return" direction parameter? Or am I talking about the language again :) . From your saying, I ask in a different way. Why people use "return" direction parameter instead of "return" value? Are there any concrete examples? Cheers –  milesma Oct 26 '11 at 2:41
    
"binding" is just the action of storing something. In common dialog we do say "return value" a lot, but you do not always return values :) sometimes you are returning a reference to a value, for example. Return direction parameter was invented by UML to disconnect it from the real world of how languages are implemented. There could be a language in fantasy land that always requires you to pass a variable parameter to a function in order to get the result. –  MartyTPS Oct 26 '11 at 2:57
    
or to be extreme, we could have a language implemented like this (made this up off the top of my head) declare funtion1(param) { dowork and then goto function2(resultoffunction1)} declare function2(param) { } resultoffunction1 is a "return parameter from function1 which is passed to function2 which is just continuing with the rest of the program" –  MartyTPS Oct 26 '11 at 3:05

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