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I have an array of char pointers of length 175,000. Each pointer points to a c-string array of length 100, each character is either 1 or 0. I need to compare the difference between the strings.

char* arr[175000];

So far, I have two for loops where I compare every string with every other string. The comparison functions basically take two c-strings and returns an integer which is the number of differences of the arrays.

This is taking really long on my 4-core machine. Last time I left it to run for 45min and it never finished executing. Please advise of a faster solution or some optimizations.


Example:

000010
000001

have a difference of 2 since the last two bits do not match.

After i calculate the difference i store the value in another array

                int holder;

                for(int x = 0;x < UsedTableSpace; x++){
                    int min = 10000000;

                    for(int y = 0; y < UsedTableSpace; y++){

                        if(x != y){
                            //compr calculates difference between two c-string arrays
                            int tempDiff =compr(similarity[x]->matrix, similarity[y]->matrix);

                            if(tempDiff < min){
                                min = tempDiff;
                                holder = y;
                            }
                        }       
                    }
                    similarity[holder]->inbound++;

                }
share|improve this question
    
Post some code. –  muntoo Oct 26 '11 at 1:36
1  
The answer depends entirely on the precise meaning of "compare the difference between the strings". Equality? Greater? Something else? –  vz0 Oct 26 '11 at 1:38
3  
Also: C or C++? They aren't interchangeable. –  GManNickG Oct 26 '11 at 1:39
2  
first: use bitset/dynamic_bitset; second: what are you comparing and where does the result go? (What is the result anyway?) Depending on that you might be able to use common optimized full text search algorithms –  sehe Oct 26 '11 at 1:39
1  
Do you need to know the distance between all pairs, or something else? Eg, would a quick way to find all strings with edit distance n to a target string be useful? –  Nick Johnson Oct 26 '11 at 2:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One simple optimization is to compare the strings only once. If the difference between A and B is 12, the difference between B and A is also 12. Your running time is going to drop almost half.

In code:

int compr(const char* a, const char* b) {
  int d = 0, i;
  for (i=0; i < 100; ++i)
    if (a[i] != b[i]) ++d;
  return d;
}

void main_function(...) {

    for(int x = 0;x < UsedTableSpace; x++){
        int min = 10000000;

        for(int y = x + 1; y < UsedTableSpace; y++){

            //compr calculates difference between two c-string arrays
            int tempDiff = compr(similarity[x]->matrix, similarity[y]->matrix);

            if(tempDiff < min){
                min = tempDiff;
                holder = y;
            }
        }
        similarity[holder]->inbound++;
    }
}

Notice the second-th for loop, I've changed the start index.

Some other optimizations is running the run method on separate threads to take advantage of your 4 cores.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your response please elaborate more on. Running the run command. –  Mike G Oct 26 '11 at 1:57
1  
I replied before you posted the two-loop code. I've updated my answer. –  vz0 Oct 26 '11 at 2:03
1  
+1: This single optimization will probably provide the greatest improvement for the least amount of effort. –  StriplingWarrior Oct 26 '11 at 2:17

With more information, we could probably give you better advice, but based on what I understand of the question, here are some ideas:

  1. Since you're using each character to represent a 1 or a 0, you're using several times more memory than you need to use, which creates a big performance impact when it comes to caching and such. Instead, represent your data using numeric values that you can think of in terms of a series of bits.
  2. Once you've implemented #1, you can grab an entire integer or long at a time and do a bitwise XOR operation to end up with a number that has a 1 in every place where the two numbers didn't have the same values. Then you can use some of the tricks mentioned here to count these bits speedily.
  3. Work on "unrolling" your loops somewhat to avoid the number of jumps necessary. For example, the following code:

    total = total + array[i];
    total = total + array[i + 1];
    total = total + array[i + 2];
    

    ... will work faster than just looping over total = total + array[i] three times. Jumps are expensive, and interfere with the processor's pipelining. Update: I should mention that your compiler may be doing some of this for you already--you can check the compiled code to see.

  4. Break your overall data set into chunks that will allow you to take full advantage of caching. Think of your problem as a "square" with the i index on one axis and the j axis on the other. If you start with one i and iterate across all 175000 j values, the first j values you visit will be gone from the cache by the time you get to the end of the line. On the other hand, if you take the top left corner and go from j=0 to 256, most of the values on the j axis will still be in a low-level cache as you loop around to compare them with i=0, 1, 2, etc.

Lastly, although this should go without saying, I guess it's worth mentioning: Make sure your compiler is set to optimize!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply. I have added some code. –  Mike G Oct 26 '11 at 1:53
    
converting the two strings to long integers, xoring and doing some bits magic seems slower to me then just comparing the two arrays. –  vz0 Oct 26 '11 at 1:58
2  
@vz0: The point is to avoid storing it in a string at all. –  GManNickG Oct 26 '11 at 2:02
    
@vz0: GMan is right. Ideally you could start out by representing them as numeric values in the first place. But even if not, converting them to integers will require a single pass through the array, which will be (1/175000)th the cost of the overall function. So if the bitwise magic makes things go 2x faster that'll make a huge difference. My guess is the combination of these techniques will make things go several times faster. –  StriplingWarrior Oct 26 '11 at 2:12
    
+1 (2 if I could) for bit operations and tiling. –  Xeo Oct 26 '11 at 4:04

What is your goal, i.e. what do you want to do with the Hamming Distances (which is what they are) after you've got them? For example, if you are looking for the closest pair, or most distant pair, you probably can get an O(n ln n) algorithm instead of the O(n^2) methods suggested so far. (At n=175000, n^2 is 15000 times larger than n ln n.)

For example, you could characterize each 100-bit number m by 8 4-bit numbers, being the number of bits set in 8 segments of m, and sort the resulting 32-bit signatures into ascending order. Signatures of the closest pair are likely to be nearby in the sorted list. It is easy to lower-bound the distance between two numbers if their signatures differ, giving an effective branch-and-bound process as less-distant numbers are found.

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