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I'm trying to complete a project, and though I have tried, I can't seem to do this. Here's the enum:

public enum Symbols {
    /**
     * The Seven
     */
    SEVEN(12,"images/seven.jpg"),
    /**
     * The Watermelon
     */
    WATERMELON(10,"images/watermelon.jpg"),
    /**
     * The Orange
     */
    ORANGE(8,"images/orange.jpg"),
    /**
     * The Plum
     */
    PLUM(6,"images/plum.jpg"),
    /**
     * The Lemon
     */
    LEMON(4,"images/lemon.jpg"),
    /**
     * The Cherry
     */
    CHERRY(2,"images/cherry.jpg");

    private int payout;             // Symbol payout value
    private BufferedImage image;    // Symbol image
    private String icon;            // Symbol file name

    /** Constructor - Payout must be positive and even, file name must not be null
     * @param payout - Symbol payout amount
     * @param icon - Symbol image file name
     */
    Symbols(int payout, String icon){
        this.payout = payout;
        this.icon = icon;
        loadImage(icon);
    }

    /** Copy Constructor - Symbol must not be null
     * @param s - A single symbol
     */
    Symbols(Symbols s){
        payout = s.payout;
        icon = s.icon;
        loadImage(icon);
    }

Now I can go into main and create a symbol named "s" like this:

Symbols s = Symbols.CHERRY;

But I'm having trouble making a copy of "s" using the copy constructor given:

Symbols t = Symbols(s);

If I try to do this, I get the error: "The method Symbols(Symbols) is undefined for the type Symbols."

Thanks

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7 Answers 7

Well you need to make it public but it still isn't going to work. There are no copy constructors in Java; you can't 'new' an Enum, which is the next error; and in any case Java goes to great lengths to ensure there is only one copy of each enum value per JVM. What exactly do you think you need a copy constructor for?

Solution:

Symbols s = Symbols.CHERRY;
Symbols t = s;
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Well there are copy constructors if you define them (which he's done). –  Mark Peters Oct 26 '11 at 3:28
    
@MarkPeters but the compiler won't use them unless you call them yourself. For example his code as given won't compile, and if he had written t = s; the compiler wouldn't invoke the copy constructor automatically. I don't call that a copy constructor. Just a constructor. –  EJP Oct 26 '11 at 3:30
    
You're right, it's not a copy constructor in that there is syntax which calls it implicitly (like I suppose C++ would). But I think it's still common practice to call a constructor which takes an instance of its own class a "copy constructor". –  Mark Peters Oct 26 '11 at 3:37
    
@MarkPeters I can't help what other people may do ;-) –  EJP Oct 26 '11 at 3:40

enums are supposed to be an immutable set - you're not supposed to be able to make new ones. And the constructors are enforced as private (even though not marked as such).

Since they're immutable you are always supposed to be guaranteed that if you have an instance of a Symbols.CHERRY object it's always the same instance, so you can do things like test for object equivalence instead of equals - i.e. you can do

if (symbol == CHERRY) 

instead of

if (symbol.equals(CHERRY))

because if you have to CHERRYs they're guaranteed to be the same object.

This is more intended to be an enforced version of the Typesafe Enum pattern:

public class Suit {
    private final String name;

    public static final Suit CLUBS =new Suit("clubs");
    public static final Suit DIAMONDS =new Suit("diamonds");
    public static final Suit HEARTS =new Suit("hearts");
    public static final Suit SPADES =new Suit("spades");    

    private Suit(String name){
        this.name =name;
    }
}
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Well, constructors are only called when you invoke the new keyword:

Symbols t = new Symbols(s);

Without new it thinks you're trying to invoke a method named Symbols.

But that's irrelevant in this case because you can't instantiate an enum outside of the constant definitions. If you could, it wouldn't be an enum.

Let's examine why you'd ever want to have a copy of an enum. If you need a copy, it's necessarily because you're saying that the enum is stateful, which must not be true. Enums must be immutable. And since they must be immutable, you can share the instances anywhere.

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You use ENUMs something like this:

public enum Symbols {
    SEVEN(12,"images/seven.jpg"),
    WATERMELON(10,"images/watermelon.jpg");

    private int payout;
    private String icon;

    Symbols(int payout, String icon){
        this.payout = payout;
        this.icon = icon;
    }

    public int getPayout(){
        return this.payout;
    }

    public String getIcon(){
        return this.icon;
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println(Symbols.SEVEN.getPayout());
    }
}

Other answers gave a nice explanation on why you cannot have copy constructors. Basically the "instances" (SEVEN and WATERMELON) of your enum class are immutable, so you cannot specify any other value inside them at run time and you cannot create new ones.

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You can't add a constructor in the Symbols enum as such but you can add a static method in Symbols as follows:

/**
 * @param symbol is non-null.
 * @return a new instance of the provided symbol.
 */
public static Symbols newInstance(Symbols symbol) {
  return Symbols.values()[symbol.ordinal()];
}
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enums are not normal classes. you cannot manually construct them. the enum "class" itself is basically an "abstract" class. each value is implemented as a separate specific subclass of the enum "class".

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It is because you need to use the keyword "new" for call a constructor. But I think that you can't call to the Enum constructor directly

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