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So here is the problem I'm beating my head against: I have a custom user control that exposes two dependency properties that are bound to my ViewModel. In my ViewModel I have an instance of a class that holds multiple properties that express values that relate to the user control as well as to items that control manipulates. Here's a bit of sample code to explain it visually so here is a simple sample of my control, it's a Slider that is combined with a checkbox that allows the user to lock the slider.

    <custom:SliderControl IsLocked="{Binding Path=CustomClass.IsLocked, Mode=TwoWay}" SliderValue="{Binding Path=CustomClass.Value, Mode=TwoWay}" />

IsLocked and SliderValue are dependency properties that effectively manipulate the checkbox and slider that are contained in the custom control. All of the control functions work as intended, except for the bindings to the class I've defined. If I create individual properties, as in one int property and one bool property the bindings work as intended. However I have five sliders, and each slider in my actual code has five properties that tie in to them. I'm trying to eliminate code duplication by creating a class to hold these properties in a reusable object shrinking my 25 properties down to 5 class instances.

My CustomClass inherits ObservableObject and has a bool property and int property named IsLocked and SliderValue respectively. For more visual aids here is what it looks like:

    public class CustomClass : ObservableObject
    {
        public const string SliderValuePropertyName = "SliderValue";
        private int _sliderValue= 0;
        public int SliderValue
        {
            get
            {
                return _sliderValue;
            }

            set
            {
                if (_sliderValue== value)
                {
                    return;
                }


                _sliderValue= value;
                RaisePropertyChanged(SliderValuePropertyName );
            }
        }

    public const string IsCheckedPropertyName = "IsChecked";
    private bool _isChecked = false;
    public bool IsChecked
    {
        get
        {
            return _isChecked;
        }

        set
        {
            if (_isChecked == value)
            {
                return;
            }
            _isChecked = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged(IsCheckedPropertyName);
        }
    }

The ViewModel property is very similar and looks like this, an new instance of the class is created when the ViewModel loads:

    public const string SliderOnePropertyName = "SliderOne";
    private CustomClass _sliderOne;
    public CustomClass SliderOne
    {
        get
        {
            return _sliderOne;
        }

        set
        {
            if (_sliderOne== value)
            {
                return;
            }

            _sliderOne= value;
            RaisePropertyChanged(SliderOnePropertyName );
        }
    }

Why won't the updating of the dependency property that is bound to the property in the class update properly? Is it because you can't properly update the class instance property by itself and instead have to update the entire class instance whenever changes occur? Or do I need to further customize the setter in this ViewModel property? As it sits now changing the slider value or checkbox never hits the bound property at all and nothing errors out when debugging.

EDIT: I've also surrounded the control in a Border and set the Border UIElement's DataContext to that of the class and then subsequently applied the more simple path binding to the underlying custom control. This however did not have any effect on my problem.

I'm a homegrown programmer so I often miss things when putting code together and I'm guessing this is the case here, unless what I'm trying just won't work.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT: So I've been toying around with using a custom event that will let me know when the specific property of the custom control changes and then having that event wired up in my ViewModel to update the existing class. This works but still creates code duplication as now I have to have 10 events, 2 events per control, one to check for when the value of the slider changes and the other to detect when the checkbox IsChecked value changes. This code duplication exists since you can't route multiple command parameters (like a simple string identifier for which slider is being manipulated as well as the value you want to use in the code). This limitation means I can't just use 2 events that differentiate between which control is undergoing changes within the defined method as exposing the physical control to the ViewModel breaks the MVVM pattern. Using a class as the datacontext for the user control made it so I didn't care what control was being manipulated as they each had their own class instance. Using events this unravels the MVVM pattern as now I need to know which of the five controls is being manipulated by the user.

It can't be this hard to use a class in property bindings. I have to be missing something remedial.

share|improve this question
    
Have you checked the output window for binding errors? –  s1mm0t Oct 26 '11 at 6:15
    
Yes, there are no errors at all in the Output window, debugging returns no issues at all. I believe this is common when using bindings within XAML, if a binding is not valid it never reports an issue if the property can initialize with a default value. –  TheEighthDay Oct 26 '11 at 8:00
    
What's the DataContext of the view set to? –  ChrisF Oct 26 '11 at 8:01
    
The DataContext of the view is set to the ViewModel assigned to the page. –  TheEighthDay Oct 26 '11 at 8:03
    
set the datacontext again on your SliderControl user control –  Rumplin Oct 26 '11 at 8:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

here is a full example:

public partial class MainPage : UserControl
{
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.DataContext = new ViewModel();
    }
}


public class ViewModel
{
    public SliderValues slv { get; private set; }

    public ViewModel()
    {
        slv = new SliderValues();
    }
}

public class SliderValues : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    bool _isLocked = false;

    public bool IsLocked
    {
        get { return _isLocked; }
        set
        {
            _isLocked = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("IsLocked");
        }

    }
    int _theValue = 5;

    public int TheValue
    {
        get { return _theValue; }
        set
        {
            _theValue = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("TheValue");
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private void OnPropertyChanged(string prop)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(prop));

    }
}

Now the xaml:

<UserControl x:Class="TestBindings.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="400">

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        <Slider Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="114,138,0,0" Name="slider1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="100"
                DataContext="{Binding slv}" Value="{Binding TheValue, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly where I'm at now. The problem I created for myself was that I defined the class in a separate file, and thought that I needed to create a property for the class instance that raised the INotifyPropertyChanged in my ViewModel, this obscured that everything was happening in the class code and ignoring the property that I created. This makes it difficult to execute methods that rely on knowing when the class properties change. I'm solving this by using MVVM Light messaging. Thank you for this code example! –  TheEighthDay Oct 26 '11 at 9:18
    
The reason I have methods that execute when any individual slider control is manipulated is that they have an interdependency and all relate to a shared maximum setting that if reached will then begin to leach off of the slider control with the highest value. This created a situation where I needed all the controls when manipulated to then check against all the other controls and to create parity if the maximum was breached. –  TheEighthDay Oct 26 '11 at 9:21

May be there is just a syntactical error. Try this

{Binding Path=CustomClass.IsLocked, Mode=TwoWay}

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like it could be it –  Alastair Pitts Oct 26 '11 at 6:06
    
Sorry, my typed out example does indeed have multiple typos but the actual code does not. I've fixed them now. –  TheEighthDay Oct 26 '11 at 6:08

Try this...<custom:SliderControl DataContext="{Binding CustomClass}" IsLocked="{Binding IsLocked, Mode=TwoWay}" SliderValue="{Binding Value, Mode=TwoWay}" />

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