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A textbook I recently read discussed row major & column major arrays. The book primarily focused on 1 and 2 dimensional arrays but didn't really discuss 3 dimensional arrays. I'm looking for some good examples to help solidify my understanding of addressing an element within a multi-dimensional array using row major & column major arrays.

           +--+--+--+  |
          /  /  /  /|  |
         +--+--+--+ +  |        +---+---+---+---+
        /  /  /  /|/|  |       /   /   /   /   /|
       +--+--+--+ + +  |      +---+---+---+---+ +
      /  /  /  /|/|/|  |     /   /   /   /   /|/|
     +--+--+--+ + + +  |    +---+---+---+---+ + +
    /  /  /  /|/|/|/|  |   /   /   /   /   /|/|/|
   +--+--+--+ + + + +  |  +---+---+---+---+ + + +
  /  /  /  /|/|/|/|/   |  |000|001|002|003|/|/|/|
 +--+--+--+ + + + +    |  +---+---+---+---+ + + +
 |00|01|02|/|/|/|/     |  |004|005|006|007|/|/|/|
 +--+--+--+ + + +      |  +---+---+---+---+ + + +
 |03|04|05|/|/|/       |  |008|009|00A|00B|/|/|/
 +--+--+--+ + +        |  +---+---+---+---+ + +
 |06|07|08|/|/         |  |00C|00D|00E|00F|/|/
 +--+--+--+ +          |  +---+---+---+---+ +
 |09|0A|0B|/           |  |010|011|012|013|/
 +--+--+--+            |  +---+---+---+---+
 arr[5][3][4]          |    arr[3][4][5]

NOTE: Original question incorrectly represented arr[3][4][5]. I have learned that the original subscript represents depth. The data has been corrected to reflect intended array representation.

Example hex data
 +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+    
 |000|001|002|003|  |100|101|102|103|  |200|201|202|203|  
 +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  
 |004|005|006|007|  |104|105|106|107|  |204|205|206|207|   
 +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+   
 |008|009|00A|00B|  |108|109|10A|10B|  |208|209|20A|20B|   
 +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+   
 |00C|00D|00E|00F|  |10C|10D|10E|10F|  |20C|20D|20E|20F|
 +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+ 
 |010|011|012|013|  |110|111|112|113|  |210|211|212|213|
 +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+ 
      slice 0            slice 1            slice 2

 short Arr[3][4][5]; // assume array is filled with hex test data

 arr[1][2][3] = 0x10B use slice 1, row 2, col 3
 arr[2][3][4] = 0x210 use slice 2, row 3, col 4 
                       resolves to row 4, col 0

row major
{000,001,002,003,004,005,006,007,008,009,00A,00B,00C,00D,00E,00F,010,011,012,013, 100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,10A,10B,10C,10D,10E,10F,110,111,112,113, 200,201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209,20A,20B,20C,20D,20E,20F,210,211,212,213}

column major {000,004,008,00C,010,001,005,009,00D,011,002,006,00A,00E,012,003,007,00B,00F,013, 100,104,108,10C,110,101,105,109,10D,111,102,106,10A,10E,112,103,107,10B,10F,113, 200,204,208,20C,210,201,205,209,20D,211,202,206,20A,20E,212,203,207,20B,20F,213}

  Calculation offset for arr[1][2][3] using row major offset?
  Calculation offset for arr[1][2][3] using column major offset?
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5  
Wow. Nice ascii drawing. –  Trevor Boyd Smith Apr 30 '09 at 13:04

5 Answers 5

I would see the Row-major order Wikipedia article. There is a section that described dimensions higher than 2. There is also a good article here. That article gives the following formula for a three-dimensional array using a row-major layout:

Address = Base + ((depthindex*col_size+colindex) * row_size + rowindex) * Element_Size

For a 3D array: type A[depth] [col] [row]. The base is the starting offset of the array. In addition, the size variables are the different sizes of each dimension. The Element_Size variable denotes the size of whatever type the array is composed of.

Suppose you had row-major array a[4][6][5] composed of standard C++ integers. To compute the offset of a[1][3][2], you would plug the following numbers into the formula:

Address = Base + ((1 * 6 + 3) * 5 + 2) * 4

For a 3 dimensional array that has a column-major layout, the equation would rather be this:

Address = Base + ((rowindex*col_size+colindex) * depth_size + depthindex) * Element_Size

The numbers you would plug in for the example above using a column-major layout would now be this:

Address = Base + ((2 * 6 + 3) * 4 + 1) * 4
share|improve this answer
    
Aren't 3D arrays addressed by [col][row][depth] or [X][Y][Z]? –  mrwes Apr 27 '09 at 9:21
    
On further investigation it turns out that C treats 3D arrays as [depth][col][row] –  mrwes Apr 27 '09 at 19:28

Don't artificially constrain yourself by focusing on 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional. Instead focus on learning the expression for addressing n-dimensional arrays.

Expressing n-dimensional addressing would solidfy your grasp on this subject and will be easier to remember one formula rather than separate formulas for 2d and 3d addressing.


Here's my attempt at n-dimensional addressing:

#define LEN 10

int getValue_nDimensions( int * baseAddress, int * indexes, int nDimensions ) {
    int i;
    int offset = 0;
    for( i = 0; i < nDimensions; i++ ) {
        offset += pow(LEN,i) * indexes[nDimensions - (i + 1)];
    }

    return *(baseAddress + offset);
}

int main() {
    int i;
    int * baseAddress;
    int val1;
    int val2;

    // 1 dimensions
    int array1d[LEN];
    int array1d_indexes[] = {2};
    int array1d_nDimensions = 1;
    baseAddress = &array1d[0];
    for(i = 0; i < LEN; i++) { baseAddress[i] = i; }
    val1 = array1d[2];
    val2 = getValue_nDimensions( // Equivalent to: val1 = array1d[2];
        baseAddress,
        &array1d_indexes[0],
        array1d_nDimensions
    );
    printf("SANITY CHECK: %d %d\n",val1,val2);

    // 3 dimensions
    int array3d[LEN][LEN][LEN];
    int array3d_indexes[] = {2,3,4};
    int array3d_nDimensions = 3;
    baseAddress = &array3d[0][0][0];
    for(i = 0; i < LEN*LEN*LEN; i++) { baseAddress[i] = i; }
    val1 = array3d[2][3][4];
    val2 = getValue_nDimensions( // Equivalent to: val1 = array3d[2][3][4];
        baseAddress,
        &array3d_indexes[0],
        array3d_nDimensions
    );
    printf("SANITY CHECK: %d %d\n",val1,val2);

    // 5 dimensions
    int array5d[LEN][LEN][LEN][LEN][LEN];
    int array5d_indexes[] = {2,3,4,5,6};
    int array5d_nDimensions = 5;
    baseAddress = &array5d[0][0][0][0][0];
    for(i = 0; i < LEN*LEN*LEN*LEN*LEN; i++) { baseAddress[i] = i; }
    val1 = array5d[2][3][4][5][6];
    val2 = getValue_nDimensions( // Equivalent to: val1 = array5d[2][3][4][5][6];
        baseAddress,
        &array5d_indexes[0],
        array5d_nDimensions
    );
    printf("SANITY CHECK: %d %d\n",val1,val2);

    return 0;
}

Output:

SANITY CHECK:     2     2
SANITY CHECK:   234   234
SANITY CHECK: 23456 23456
share|improve this answer
    
Don't artificially constraint yourself on n-dimensional arrays with constant dimensions (LEN). –  ziggystar Dec 14 '12 at 12:19
    
@ziggystar changing LEN to a runtime variable is pretty trivial. You have the required minimum rep. So feel free to edit my answer. –  Trevor Boyd Smith Dec 14 '12 at 19:19

The terms 'row major' and 'column major' don't translate well to a third dimention. The notion that the next element stored is from the current row or current column break down. It sounds a little comical but this becomes 'depth major' vs. 'width major' ordering. Each subsequent element is no longer a single entry but one full two dimentional matrix.

          / X
         / 
        +---+---+---+
       /   /   /   /|  
      +---+---+---+-+-------   
      | 1 | 5 | 9 |/|  Y
      +---+---+---+ +
      | 2 | 6 | A |/|
      +---+---+---+ +
      | 3 | 7 | B |/| 
      +---+---+---+ +
      | 4 | 8 | C |/
      +---+---+---+

So the memory would literally have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 in memory sequentially. This is classical column major ordering. By placing the D entry at the position marked X you have not changed the fact that your matrix has colum major ordering. If you place the D entry where the Y is you still have not changed the fact that you are using column major ordering. Where you decide to place the next block will affect if you are using depth major (X) or width major (Y) ordering. As you well know these are equivalents but calling it something may assist you writing equations:

[ 0 Based arrays assumed ]

You access the memory location of a two dimentional colum major element through the equation:

MatrixOffset = base + (sizeof(entry) * ((4 * ( column - 1 ))   +  (row - 1)))

This address would be adjusted using depth or width its all a matter of terminology.

TotalOffset = MatrixOffset + (sizeof(entry) * ((4 * 3) * (depth - 1)))

OR

TotalOffset = MatrixOffset + (sizeof(entry) * ((4 * 3) * (width - 1)))

The constants 4 and 3 would likely be variables COLUMNS and ROWS.

Don't ask me about the 4th dimention!

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When I asked this question I was hoping to find some good 3 dimensional array examples. Especially code examples. Since I didn't find anything that was understandable, I decided to create a little C program to help display the concept. It uses the same test data in a 3x4x5 array. It also includes test data for a 5x5x5 array. It creates a column major array from the row major array so the offset calculations can be verified.

The array offset methods are:

  • char *calc_RowMajor(char *Base, int elemSz, int depth_idx, int row_idx, int col_idx)
  • char *calc_ColMajor(char *Base, int elemSz, int depth_idx, int col_idx, int row_idx)

    I added comments in the code where applicable to help clarify what the code is doing.

    
    //
    // Arrays.cpp : 
    //     Purpose: Display rowMajor & colMajor data and calculations.
    //
    #include "stdafx.h"
    
    #define _show_Arrays 1	// 1=display rowMajor & colMajor arrays
    #define _square_array 0 // 1=use arr[5][5][5], 0=use arr[3][4][5]
    
    #if (_square_array == 1)
        const int depthSz = 5;
        const int rowSz = 5;
        const int colSz = 5;
        /*
        +---+---+---+---+---+
        |x00|x01|x02|x03|x04|
        +---+---+---+---+---+ 
        |x05|x06|x07|x08|x09|   
        +---+---+---+---+---+  
        |x0A|x0B|x0C|x0D|x0E|   
        +---+---+---+---+---+   
        |x0F|x10|x11|x12|x13|
        +---+---+---+---+---+ 
        |x14|x15|x16|x17|x18|
        +---+---+---+---+---+ 
              slice x          
        */
        short row_arr[depthSz][colSz][rowSz] = {
        { /* slice 0 */
          {0x000,0x001,0x002,0x003,0x004},
          {0x005,0x006,0x007,0x008,0x009},
          {0x00A,0x00B,0x00C,0x00D,0x00E},
          {0x00F,0x010,0x011,0x012,0x013},
          {0x014,0x015,0x016,0x017,0x018}},
        { /* slice 1 */
          {0x100,0x101,0x102,0x103,0x104},
          {0x105,0x106,0x107,0x108,0x109},
          {0x10A,0x10B,0x10C,0x10D,0x10E},
          {0x10F,0x110,0x111,0x112,0x113},
          {0x114,0x115,0x116,0x117,0x118}},
        { /* slice 2 */
          {0x200,0x201,0x202,0x203,0x204},
          {0x205,0x206,0x207,0x208,0x209},
          {0x20A,0x20B,0x20C,0x20D,0x20E},
          {0x20F,0x210,0x211,0x212,0x213},
          {0x214,0x215,0x216,0x217,0x218}},
        { /* slice 3 */
          {0x300,0x301,0x302,0x303,0x304},
          {0x305,0x306,0x307,0x308,0x309},
          {0x30A,0x30B,0x30C,0x30D,0x30E},
          {0x30F,0x310,0x311,0x312,0x313},
          {0x314,0x315,0x316,0x317,0x318}},
        { /* slice 4 */
          {0x400,0x401,0x402,0x403,0x404},
          {0x405,0x406,0x407,0x408,0x409},
          {0x40A,0x40B,0x40C,0x40D,0x40E},
          {0x40F,0x410,0x411,0x412,0x413},
          {0x414,0x415,0x416,0x417,0x418}}
        };
    
    #else
      const int depthSz = 3;
        const int rowSz = 4;
        const int colSz = 5;
        /*
        +---+---+---+---+
        |000|001|002|003|  
        +---+---+---+---+  
        |004|005|006|007|   
        +---+---+---+---+   
        |008|009|00A|00B|   
        +---+---+---+---+   
        |00C|00D|00E|00F|
        +---+---+---+---+ 
        |010|011|012|013|
        +---+---+---+---+ 
             slice x
        */
        short row_arr[depthSz][colSz][rowSz] = {
        {  /* slice 0 */
          {0x000,0x001,0x002,0x003},
          {0x004,0x005,0x006,0x007},
          {0x008,0x009,0x00A,0x00B},
          {0x00C,0x00D,0x00E,0x00F},
          {0x010,0x011,0x012,0x013}},
        { /* slice 1 */
          {0x100,0x101,0x102,0x103},
          {0x104,0x105,0x106,0x107},
          {0x108,0x109,0x10A,0x10B},
          {0x10C,0x10D,0x10E,0x10F},
          {0x110,0x111,0x112,0x113}},
        {  /* slice 2 */
          {0x200,0x201,0x202,0x203},
          {0x204,0x205,0x206,0x207},
          {0x208,0x209,0x20A,0x20B},
          {0x20C,0x20D,0x20E,0x20F},
          {0x210,0x211,0x212,0x213}}
        };
    #endif
        short col_arr[depthSz*colSz*rowSz]; //
    
    char *calc_RowMajor(char *Base, int elemSz, int depth_idx, int row_idx, int col_idx)
    {  // row major slice is navigated by rows
      char *address;
      int   lbound = 0;	// lower bound (0 for zero-based arrays)
      address = Base    	/* use base passed */
         + ((depth_idx-lbound)*(colSz*rowSz*elemSz))	/* select slice */
         + ((row_idx-lbound)*rowSz*elemSz)		/* select row */
         + ((col_idx-lbound)*elemSz);		/* select col */
        return address;
    }
    char *calc_ColMajor(char *Base, int elemSz, int depth_idx, int col_idx, int row_idx)
    {  // col major slice is navigated by columns
      char *address;
      int   lbound = 0;	// lower bound (0 for zero-based arrays)
      int   pageSz = colSz*rowSz*elemSz; 
      int   offset;
    
      offset = (col_idx-lbound)*(colSz*elemSz)  /* select column */
             + (row_idx-lbound)*(elemSz);   /* select row */
        if (offset >= pageSz)
        {	// page overflow, rollover
        	offset -= (pageSz-elemSz);							/* ajdust offset back onto page */
        }
        address = Base			  /* use base passed */
                + ((depth_idx-lbound)*pageSz)  /* select slice */
                + offset;
        return address;
    }
    
    void disp_slice(char *pStr, short *pArr,int slice,int cols, int rows)
    {
      printf("== %s slice %d == %p\r\n",pStr, slice,pArr+(slice*rows*cols));
      for(int x=0;x<rows;x++)
      {
        for(int y=0;y<cols;y++)
          printf("%03X ",*(pArr+(slice*rows*cols)+(x*cols)+y));
          printf("\r\n");
      }
    }
    
    int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
    {
      // initialize col based array using row based array data
      { // convert row_arr into col_arr
        short *pSrc = &row_arr[0][0][0];
        short *pDst = &col_arr[0];
        for(int d=0;d<depthSz;d++)
          for(int r=0;r<rowSz;r++)
            for(int c=0;c<colSz;c++)
            {
        *pDst++ = *(pSrc+((d*rowSz*colSz)+(c*rowSz)+r));
            }
      }
    
      printf("Using Array[%d][%d][%d]\r\n",depthSz,rowSz,colSz);
    
    #if (_show_Arrays == 1)
      { for(int x=0;x<depthSz;x++) {disp_slice("rowMajor",&row_arr[0][0][0],x,rowSz,colSz);}}
      { for(int x=0;x<depthSz;x++) {disp_slice("colMajor",&col_arr[0],x,rowSz,colSz);}}
    #endif
    
      int d = 2;    // depth
      int r = 3;    // row
      int c = 4;    // column
    
      for(d=0;d<depthSz;d++)
      { 
        c = r = d;  // simple access test pattern arr[0][0][0],arr[1][1][1],arr[2][2][2],...
        { // retrieve Array element
          printf("    row_arr[%d][%d][%d] = %x\t",d,r,c,row_arr[d][r][c]);
          printf("&row_arr[%d][%d][%d] = %p\r\n",d,r,c,&row_arr[d][r][c]);
        }
        { // retrieve RowMajor element
          short *pRowMajor = (short*)calc_RowMajor((char*)&row_arr[0][0][0],sizeof(short),d,r,c);
          printf("calc_RowMajor(%d,%d,%d) = %x\t\t",d,r,c,*pRowMajor);
          printf("pRowMajor = %p\r\n",pRowMajor);
        }
        {   // retrieve ColMajor element
          short *pColMajor = (short*)calc_ColMajor((char*)&col_arr[0],sizeof(short),d,c,r);
          printf("calc_ColMajor(%d,%d,%d) = %x\t\t",d,r,c,*pColMajor);
          printf("pColMajor = %p\r\n",pColMajor);
        }
     } // for
    
     getchar(); // just to hold the console while looking at the information
      return 0;
    }
    
  • share|improve this answer

    Basically in a 3D arrray with row major E.g Arr[3][4][5] when u want Arr[0],it looks for the front slice of the image like above Arr[1] second slice and so on. so Arr[0] means 2D array of size [4][5] ,so every Arr[x] corresponds to x*(4*5) Now about Arr[x][y] can be thought of a 1D array of size [5] whose position is [x][y] from top view in the image above so when when we want Arr[x][y] = x*(4*5)+y*(5) now Arr[x][y][z] is the specific element of Arr[x][y] at depth z Arr[x][y][z]=x*(4*5)+y*5+z now on the basis of size of the data type u want to store in the array,the offset can be multiplied to the size get the address with respect to start

    share|improve this answer

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