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I have been working on function to map the bytes of a binary file to another set of bytes. I am reading from and writing to the same file. My problem is that every time i do it i end up with extra bytes unless i move to the end of the file before closing it, here is my code:

with open(self._path,'r+b') as source:
    for lookAt in range(0,self._size[1]*self._size[2],1):
        source.seek(lookAt*self._size[0],0)
        readBuffer = array.array('B')
        readBuffer.fromfile(source, self._size[0])
        newLine = array.array('B',[mappingDict[mat] for mat in readBuffer])
        source.seek(lookAt*self._size[0],0)
        newLine.tofile(source)
        source.seek(0,2) # Magic line that solves stupid bug
source.close()

I am using the array module to read and write data since i got the same problem when i used read() and write(). I do not understand why the 'Magic line' solves the problem since that's never used. I will appreciate any insight i can get on this.

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What is in the mapping dict? bytes or unicode / string? Also, what is in _size at 0, 1, and 2? –  agf Oct 26 '11 at 6:43
2  
Because you are using with, the last line source.close() is unnecessary. –  vz0 Oct 26 '11 at 6:54
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2 Answers

Comment (answer follows):

I see the same behavior as you:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import os
import sys

filename = '/tmp/a'
with open(filename, 'wb') as f:
    f.write(b'1234a67b8ca')
print(open(filename, 'rb').read())

bufsize = 3

table = bytes.maketrans(b'abcde', b'xyzzz') # mapping
with open(filename, 'r+b') as f:
    for i in range(0, os.path.getsize(filename), bufsize):
        f.seek(i, os.SEEK_SET)
        b = f.read(bufsize) # result shouldn't depend on it due to 1 -> 1
        if not b: 
            break
        f.seek(i, os.SEEK_SET)
        f.write(b.translate(table))
        f.seek(0, os.SEEK_END) # magic
print(open(filename, 'rb').read())

Output (with magic line or buffering=0 or f.flush() after f.write)

b'1234a67b8ca'
b'1234x67y8zx'

Output (without magic line)

b'1234a67b8ca'
b'1234a67b8zx1234x67y8'

Answer:

If your mapping is 1 -> 1 you could use bytes.translate():

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import io
import os
import sys

filename = '/tmp/a'
data = b'1234a67b8ca'*10000
with open(filename, 'wb') as f:
    f.write(data)
assert data == open(filename, 'rb').read()
print(data[:10]+data[-10:])

bufsize = io.DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE

table = bytes.maketrans(b'abcde', b'xyzzz') # mapping
with open(filename, 'r+b') as f:
    while True:
        b = f.read(bufsize) # result shouldn't depend on bufsize due to 1 -> 1
        if not b: 
            break
        f.seek(-len(b), os.SEEK_CUR)
        f.write(b.translate(table))
        f.flush()

tr_data = data.translate(table)
assert tr_data  == open(filename, 'rb').read()
print(tr_data[:10]+tr_data[-10:])

It seems that io.BufferedRandom can't do interlaced read/seek/write (bug in Python3) without flush().

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure this answers the question -- why? However, do you get the same result with my code? –  agf Oct 26 '11 at 7:42
    
(+1) for taking the trouble to reproduce rather than guessing at the cause. –  NPE Oct 26 '11 at 7:42
1  
@agf If your code uses interlaced read/write with io.BufferedRandom() ('r+b' with default parameters returns that) then the same bug applies. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 26 '11 at 8:28
    
@J.F.Sebastian Nice find. –  agf Oct 26 '11 at 8:38
    
Thanks for taking the time. That's pretty helpful, now i know i am not going crazy. By the way another reason i am avoiding using bytes directly is that i remember reading that the b'14' string type is going to be removed in future versions of python and my code needs to work for literally forever. Thanks. –  user1013993 Oct 26 '11 at 17:08
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Having experimented with this a little, I conjecture that it is a bug in Python 3.

In support of my conjecture, I offer the following code (based on @J.F. Sebastian's):

import os
import sys

filename = '/tmp/a'
with open(filename, 'wb') as f:
    f.write(b'1234a67b8ca')
print(open(filename, 'rb').read())

bufsize = 3

with open(filename, 'r+b') as f:
    for i in range(0, os.path.getsize(filename), bufsize):
        f.seek(i, os.SEEK_SET)
        b = f.read(bufsize)
        f.seek(i, os.SEEK_SET)
        f.write(b)
#        f.seek(0, os.SEEK_END) # magic
print(open(filename, 'rb').read())

When run using Python 2.7.1, it works as you'd expect, and the magic line makes no difference.

When run using Python 3.1.2, it inexplicably requires the magic no-op seek() in order to make it work as expected.

At this point I'd suggest demonstrating the code to core Python 3 developers to get their opinion on whether this is indeed a bug.

share|improve this answer
    
I've posted a link to the bug. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 26 '11 at 8:22
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