Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I run a before_filter on some actions to check if the user is the current_user.

before_filter :correct_user,  :only => [:edit, :update, :destroy]

def update
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
    redirect_to current_user, :notice => "User updated!"
  else
    redirect_to current_user, :notice => "User not updated. waa waa."
  end
end

private
def correct_user
  if current_user != @user        
    redirect_to root_url, :notice => "Cannot act on different user."
  end
end

Not sure if this is the best way to do things, but it works (maybe it is better practice to simply use current_user instead of finding @user via params?)

Now User has_many photos, and in my photos index view, I list all the user's photos and allow for the user to set any one photo as a profile photo. The user table has a column called primary_photo_id, to hold this ID, and I use a link_to to set this:

=link_to "Make this your profile photo", user_path(@user, :user => {:primary_photo_id  => "#{photo.id}"}), :method => :put

The problem is that the before_filter kicks in and will prevent this from working because the @user that is retrieved via params[:id] fails because it is not the right params. If I remove the before_filter, it works fine but then it's not checking for the correct user anymore.

(a second somewhat related question is why the above code works but this one:

=link_to "Make this your profile photo", user_path(@user, :primary_photo_id  => "#{photo.id}"), :method => :put

doesn't.

Thanks. I'm pretty new to rails and programming so anything you can say regarding my specific question, and any bad practices I'm doing with the code here, is very much appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The before filter (#correct_user) runs before #update, so your instance variable @user isn't set yet when you are comparing it in the filter if you haven't set it in another before filter first. Your execution sequence looks like:

  1. run #correct_user - compare current_user to @user (if unset, this is nil). these will only ever match if the user isn't logged in I'm guessing
  2. assuming we made it through, run #update and look up @user

Probably the easiest way to address your problem is just to move the @user lookup into the before filter:

before_filter :correct_user,  :only => [:edit, :update, :destroy]

def edit
  # .. as before, but no need to look up user first
end

def update
  if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
    redirect_to current_user, :notice => "User updated!"
  else
    redirect_to current_user, :notice => "User not updated. waa waa."
  end
end

def destroy
  # .. as before, but no need to look up user first
end

private

def correct_user
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  if current_user != @user        
    redirect_to root_url, :notice => "Cannot act on different user."
  end
end

Since @user is now being located in the filter, there is no need to look it up again in each of your controller actions. Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
This worked great. Thanks Matt! I actually decided to use two before_filters, the first to get_user, the other to check for correct user. reads a little clearer to me even though it is probably less "dry". Instead of using user = User.find(params[:id]), i could also do user = current_user (since there's a helper method to grab the session's user).. Is this recommended generally, especially for, say, edit, update, and other things that really shouldn't be doable by anyone else but the logged in user? – kindofgreat Oct 27 '11 at 0:28
    
Yeah, frequently for that kind of condition I'll set up my before filter so that it figures out if the user is an admin and if so will allow setting from params, otherwise hard-wires to the logged in user. Something like @user = current_user.admin? ? User.find(params[:id]) : current_user. If you don't have the admin case, I'd just set it to current_user directly since you probably already have a user object instantiated, no point in doing another lookup. – Matt Sanders Oct 27 '11 at 5:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.