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I have a class:

public class MyClass
{
   public MyClass(){}
}

I would like to be able to use an XMLSeralizer to Deserialize an XDocument directly in the constructor thus:

public class MyClass
{
   private XmlSerializer _s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));

   public MyClass(){}
   public MyClass(XDocument xd)
   {
      this = (MyClass)_s.Deserialize(xd.CreateReader());
   }
}

Except I am not allowed to assign to "this" within the constructor.

Is this possible?

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For what reason you want to do it like that? –  Fischermaen Oct 26 '11 at 10:43
    
Because it would be nice to instantiate the class and just feed it an XDocument and have it set itself up like that. There are other solutions but this seems most elegant to me... I am open to better suggestions. –  One Monkey Oct 26 '11 at 10:47
    
Can't you set up the class to have data serialized into it, thus creating the instance for you? –  Yatrix Oct 27 '11 at 20:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

No, it's not possible. Serializers create objects when they deserialize. You've already created an object. Instead, provide a static method to construct from an XDocument.

public static MyClass FromXml (XDocument xd)
{
   XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));
   return (MyClass)s.Deserialize(xd.CreateReader());
}
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and how the fridge are you supposed to do when the extraTypes (knownTypes) are not known at compile time ? This is wicked, we do not even have a pre-callback to init stuff before starting to deserialize ? –  v.oddou Oct 11 '13 at 13:35

Is better use some kind of factory, e.g.:

public static MyClass Create(XDocument xd)
{
    XmlSerializer _s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));
    return (MyClass)_s.Deserialize(xd.CreateReader());
}
share|improve this answer

It's more standard to use a static load method.

public class MyClass
{
    public static MyClass Load(XDocument xDoc)
    {
        XmlSerializer _s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));
        return (MyClass)_s.Deserialize(xDoc.CreateReader());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The simple answer to your question is no, you can't. Reason therefore is that you create an object when you deserialize.

But if you really insist on the possibility for an object to instantiate itself so-to-speak, you can use a private static instance variable which you can load with the object you get after deserialization. The other public members should then work on the instance ( when it's not null that is )

an example ( out of my head, so there is a slight chance it isn't entirely correct ) :

public class MyClass
{
  private XmlSerializer _s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));
  private static MyClass mInstance = null;

  public MyClass() { /* initialization logic */ }
  public MyClass(XDocument xd) 
  {
      mInstance = (MyClass)_s.Deserialize(xd.CreateReader());
  }

  public void DoSomething()
  {
     if (mInstance != null)
       mInstance.DoSomething();
     else 
     {
         // logic for DoSomething
     }

  }
}

I hope this makes it a bit clear, but I'm not fond of such design. I think it makes it all overly complex and error sensitive.

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You realize that every MyClass that you instantiate past the first will replace the previous instantiations of the static mInstance? Then all the instantiated MyClass objects will be using the same object in memory. –  SamuelWarren Jul 17 '12 at 19:12

I came to this page in search of a way to accomplish the same thing as the OP, probably for the same reason, which is that it just seemed so utterly logical that the class should be able to construct itself from the data in the XML document. In my case, that document is a lookup table.

In studying the example, so that I could apply it successfully to my class, I noticed its striking similarity to the Singleton design pattern. In a class that I am developing, I fully implemented a Singleton, and it worked as I hoped on the first try. While work remains to be done on the class, I can see that the concept works.

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