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Ok, so I'm not sure if I'm going about this the right way. But my scenario is I've got a stored procedure I'd like to test using all the possible combinations of the inputs it takes.

Let's say I have a stored procedure that takes two parameters, like this:

set UsefulValue = exec spMyStoredProc @ProfileID, @RoleID

Now in my case, ProfileID means something like people and RoleID means something like system roles. I'm being a little general here on purpose. The point is, I have about 60,000 defined people, and about 600 defined roles.

Unfortunately, the system I'm testing is COMPLICATED, like bad-hair-day complicated, and I really need to run this procedure through its paces.

Ok, with me so far? Hopefully you are; check out this sql to generate the data that I will eventually pass to the stored procedure:

    select profiles.ProfileID, roles.RoleID from Profile profiles
cross join dbo.DefinedRoles roles

This is actually pretty good, but the problem is it's taking forever to run, and frankly I don't need every permutation of these two values.

So I tried constricting the result set like so:

select top 300000 profiles.ProfileObjID, roles.RoleName from dbo.Profile profiles
cross join dbo.rj_v_DefinedRoles roles 

But oops! That constricts the final result, so I end up with only a result that is pretty much 2-3 roles (depending on what I pass to the top verb) and with a ProfileID for each person.

What I'd like to have, my goal, is to get results for all the roles I have (about 600) and for each one, maybe only use half of the ProfileIDs instead of the whole shebang.

So does that make sense what I'm asking?

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Is this MS SQL Server? –  MatBailie Oct 26 '11 at 12:15
    
Yes it is, sorry. –  Tommy Fisk Oct 26 '11 at 12:16

4 Answers 4

If I understand the problem you want a number of test cases, but do not want them generated in favour of a specific role / person (which cross join is doing to you).

select top 300000
profiles.ProfileObjID, roles.RoleName 
from dbo.Profile profiles 
cross join dbo.rj_v_DefinedRoles roles
order by newid()

The order by will randomise your results, then top the results to get a random test set of data. This will not of course guarentee any specific role / person is in the final results, it's a percentage chance etc.

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What prevents the use of TOP(n) in the inner query? (So that the outer query is not required.) Also, note that the OP asked for a guarantee of every Role to come through to the results. –  MatBailie Oct 26 '11 at 12:26
    
One thing I tried was to add a WHERE ProfileObjID < 10000 which of course does kinda do what I want. If I could shove a between in there, then wouldn't that allow me to select arbitrary sequential chunks of people to go with roles? –  Tommy Fisk Oct 26 '11 at 12:36
    
@TommyFisk - Yes. Just use profiles CROSS JOIN roles WHERE ProfileObjID BETWEEN x AND y –  MatBailie Oct 26 '11 at 12:45
    
Dems, that indeed works! Andrew, I want to point out that I got a syntax error (SS complained about order by in a subquery), but this was fixed by declaring another table-valued variable. –  Tommy Fisk Oct 26 '11 at 12:53
    
Nothing prevents the top(n) being on the inner query, I was splitting the logic for clarity - I did specifically include in my answer that no guarentee was provided, but in test cases like this, often its a percentage confidence game, in which case this would work. –  Andrew Oct 26 '11 at 12:59

You could use ROW_NUMBER() in a couple of different places to select a portion of your data...

-- Maximum of 20,000 rows per RoleID
WITH
  combinations AS
(
  SELECT
    roles.RoleID,
    profiles.ProfileID,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY roles.RoleID) AS profile_sequence_id
  FROM
    Profile          profiles
  CROSS JOIN
    dbo.DefinedRoles roles
)
SELECT
  *
FROM
  combinations
WHERE
  profile_sequence_id < 20000

Or...

-- Maximum of 20,000 rows per RoleID
WITH
  profiles AS
(
  SELECT
    *,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY 1) AS profile_sequence_id
  FROM
    Profile
)
SELECT
  roles.RoleID,
  profiles.ProfileID
FROM
  dbo.DefinedRoles roles
CROSS JOIN
  profiles
WHERE
  profiles .profile_sequence_id < 20000
share|improve this answer
    
Dems, thank you for your answer. It's interesting, but I'm not really familiar with the syntax you're using. I found a simple way, it turns out. –  Tommy Fisk Oct 26 '11 at 12:42
    
WITH xxx AS (SELECT ???) is just a way of creating a kind of 'virtual view' or 'virtual temp table' to allow code to be broken into chunks (rather than having nested sub-queries). But it also allows recursion, allows the 'virtual view' to be joined to itself, and other funky stuff. –  MatBailie Oct 26 '11 at 12:46
    
ROW_NUMBER OVER (PARTITION BY x ORDER BY y) is an analytical or windowing function. These are relatively new to SQL, and not all vendors support them, though SQL Server 2005+ does. They're a little more complex than simple SQL, but provide significantly more powerful options. –  MatBailie Oct 26 '11 at 12:48

Have you tried using the DISTINCT keyword?

select DISTINCT profiles.ProfileObjID, roles.RoleName from dbo.Profile profiles cross join dbo.rj_v_DefinedRoles roles

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1  
Isn't the point of a cross join that each row returned is unique? (assuming you execute a vanilla one) –  Tommy Fisk Oct 26 '11 at 12:18
1  
@TommyFisk - Only if there are no duplicates in the source tables. Any duplicates in the source is replicated in the result. So the question becomes: Are both ProfileId and RoleID unique in their respective tables? –  MatBailie Oct 26 '11 at 12:24
    
I sort of botched the question a bit, I'm actually using RoleName for now, but will use RoleID in the future. So the answer would be no, more then likely. I ran this query and it was returning very weird results. Definitely don't get DISTINCT apparently. –  Tommy Fisk Oct 26 '11 at 12:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This worked well. GREATLY cuts down on the time it takes to execute the cross join.

select profiles.ProfileObjID, roles.RoleName
from dbo.rj_v_DefinedRoles roles
cross join dbo.Profile profiles
where ProfileObjId in (select ProfileObjId from dbo.Profile
                    where ProfileObjId between 10000 and 11000) 
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