Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a procedure that goes like this:

create or replace
PROCEDURE NEWJOBIDPROC (JOB_ID OUT NUMBER )
--++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--
-- PROCEDURE TO RETRIEVE THE JOB ID
--++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--
IS
BEGIN
  -- select the job_id
    SELECT VALUE+1 INTO JOB_ID FROM JOB_TABLE WHERE ID = 50;
  -- update table JOB_TABLE with the latest job id
    UPDATE JOB_TABLE SET VALUE = JOB_ID WHERE ID = 50;

END;

Now my question is the following.

Let us say I have multiple calls to this procedure at the same time. In our example let us make that two simultaneous calls to the same procedure. When both of them run the select statement they receive some value - let it be 200.

Now, they will both make an update to the job_table, with the same value of 200 - which is not what I want. I don't want duplicates.

So, how do I mark the whole code as atomic? I want the select and the update to run at the same time and be thread safe. I want two statements together to be marked as atomic.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

See the link @derobert provided for more information, but for your particular example you could do this:

UPDATE JOB_TABLE SET VALUE = VALUE +1 WHERE ID = 50
 RETURNING VALUE INTO JOB_ID;

But - have you not considered using a Sequence instead?

share|improve this answer
3  
Sequences are designed specifically for this use case. –  Adam Musch Oct 26 '11 at 14:26
    
Can you provide me with a useful link for using a Sequence? How would it benefit my case? –  oneiros Oct 27 '11 at 14:44
    
See docs: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/… and then decide whether it is useful in your case. –  Tony Andrews Oct 27 '11 at 14:52

You should lock the row if you intent to update it afterwards. The second transaction will either be blocked and wait for you to finish the transaction (default case) or will receive an error if it has tried to lock the row with NOWAIT specified.

BEGIN
  -- select the job_id and LOCK the row so that noone else can modify it
    SELECT VALUE+1 INTO JOB_ID FROM JOB_TABLE WHERE ID = 50 FOR UPDATE NOWAIT;
  -- update table JOB_TABLE with the latest job id
    UPDATE JOB_TABLE SET VALUE = JOB_ID WHERE ID = 50;    
END;

In either case locking the row prevents the "lost update" behaviour you've described.

share|improve this answer
    
Should I just lock the table before the SELECT statement and unlock it after the UPDATE? –  oneiros Oct 26 '11 at 17:32
    
You would lock only the row you intend to update (not the table itself). By the way your update already does this behind the scene (in your described test case the second update would wait until the first transaction ends). Releasing the lock is automatic at the end of your transaction (commit or rollback). –  Vincent Malgrat Oct 27 '11 at 6:58
    
I want these two statements to perform as one transaction. I want if two calls to this procedure occur at the same the table to be updated with two different values. My update doesn't do it behind the scenes. –  oneiros Oct 27 '11 at 13:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.