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There a few similar questions here on SO, but none seem to quite answer my question..

I want to create a method which takes an Enum Type, and generates a List of ListItems for the UI. Something with a signature like this could work:

public static List<ListItem> ListItemListFromEnum(Type t)
{
    ...        
}

But I would prefer not to accept any type (t must be an Enum type) So I could do something like this:

public static List<ListItem> ListItemListFromEnum(Enum e)
{
    Type t = e.GetType();
}

and just pass an enum of the correct type to the method. That would work fine, but I'd really like to take a Type parameter (as in my first example) but force it to be an Enum type.

Is this possible? Is there a way to do it with generics? Thanks

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4  
You may want to have a look at code.google.com/p/unconstrained-melody. Even when Jon Skeet doesn't answer, Jon Skeet answers. How Zen of him. –  dlev Oct 26 '11 at 14:12
    
@dlev, you assume he's not answering right now. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 26 '11 at 14:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you mean you want to make a method like this:

public static List<ListItem> ListItemsListFromEnum<T>() where T:Enum

Then that isn't possible in C#. However, Jon Skeet put together Unconstrained Melody which adds the functionality with some IL post processing. It seems that the C# compiler obeys these constraints, it just can't declare them.

That said, if that isn't what you want, you can just accept the Type as you are and check the IsEnum property. If it is, throw an Exception.

public static List<ListItem> ListItemListFromEnum(Type t)
{
    if (!t.IsEnum)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Type must be an enumeration", "t");
    }     
}

Likewise you could do the same with a generic:

public static List<ListItem> ListItemListFromEnum<T>()
{
    if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Type must be an enumeration", "t");
    }     
}

The only negative there is you will get a runtime exception rather than a compile-time one.

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Ya that's what I wanted. Guess I'll have to check at run time –  Erix Oct 26 '11 at 14:17

You can accept the Type and then throw if that type is not an enum type. That is probably the best way (until C# allows generic type placeholders to be constrained by Enum, if ever).

public static List<ListItem> ListItemListFromEnum(Type t)
{
        if (!t.IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("The type passed in must be an enum type.");                
        }

        // ...
}

This is what C# itself does with many of the Enum class's static methods (such as Enum.GetEnumNames()).

share|improve this answer
    
I figured that, but wanted compile time checking –  Erix Oct 26 '11 at 14:17
1  
@Erix: Yep, I've run into that too, there's many places I've wanted to say where T : Enum but you can't (currently) in C#. –  James Michael Hare Oct 26 '11 at 14:18

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