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So I have a file with arbitrary length with the following format:

@HEADER1
//arbitrary lines of data
@HEADER2
//arbitrary lines of data 
....

I will extract each and every header and save it in a Hashmap and then I will start parsing (sequentially) another file which is a superset of file1 e.g. has the following format:

@HEADER1
//arbitrary lines of data
//extended information
@HEADER2
//arbitrary lines of data
//extended information

So my idea is that I will built a hashmap of headers - going through file 1 once and then I will go through file 2 and on every header in it I will check if I have it in the hasmap if yes - I will do something with the data. So I was wondering whether this is an optimal solution - according to my back-of-the-head calculations this is going to be O(n) whereas if I had an arraylist and for every header in file 2 check whether it is also in the arraylist would have yield O(n^2) whereas N is the number of headers in the Arraylist - am I correct?

If there is an even more efficient way I'd be glad to head it.

EDIT:

I can't guarantee that the order of headers is going to be the same only that what is in file1 should exist in file2. Also - I don't really need to save anything for the VALUE, in this case I just need quick access to the key.

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1  
Is there any requirement that each header in file 1 exist in the same order in file 2? What is the key/value pair? The header name / lines of data? – John B Oct 26 '11 at 14:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A HashMap is a perfectly good choice here.

So the next thing to think about is what that HashMap will store. The key could probably be a String and would be "@HEADER###" . But what about the data?

You have a few options for the value in the HashMap. You could use a String, but take some time and think through what your data is. Is it the original lines of data AND the extended information you're adding? Does that data represent something structured? Like a List of items?

If you find yourself getting a String value from the map and doing additional processing consider replacing that String with a Class that better represents your data so you have something like HashMap<String, DoskiasData>.

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That's one thing I was thinking about - I don't really need anything for the value, just the Key in this particular situation so a "hash list" would have been better but since there is not such thing in java ( that I know of) – LordDoskias Oct 26 '11 at 14:24
1  
@LordDoskias There is a HashSet. – dlev Oct 26 '11 at 14:25
    
@dlev Perfect, in this case that's what I'm going to use. – LordDoskias Oct 26 '11 at 14:27
    
I don't want to prematurely optimize, but as you read the first file and build your HashSet would you need to capture any data from that file? If so use a HashMap if not use the HashSet. – Freiheit Oct 26 '11 at 14:51
    
I guess, HashSet internally uses HashMap ... so i'm pretty sure that you won't get any performance/space improvement by using HashSet – Shatu Nov 21 '12 at 15:10

Using a HashMap in the way you describe is exactly how I would approach this problem.

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Really, its a correct use of a whatever unless it ends up being a performance bottleneck. Yes, you are right its faster to use the hash map that iterate through a list for each header in file 2. Now, if the headers are in order, you can use the list and get a cleaner solution because you don't need to iterate each time.

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It depends a Circular Queue may work just as well, if the format of the files can be guaranteed. You need to create an object that is composed of X Strings and a Header.

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