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I have a base class Rules.cs. There are 2 derived classes RowRules.cs and ColumnRules.cs. I have another class Test.cs. This class has a Dictionary <int, Rules> which keeps adding the values. When I loop through the dictionary I need to know if the value is a RowRule or a ColumnRule. To better understand I have the code below.

Rules.cs

class Rules
{
    private int m_timepointId = 0;
    private int m_studyId = 0;

    public int TimepointId
    {
        get { return m_timepointId; }
        set { m_timepointId = value;}
    }

    public int StudyId
    {    
        get { return m_studyId; }
        set {m_studyId = value; }
    }
}

RowRules.cs

class RowRules : Rules
{
   private int m_row;

   public int Row
   {
       get { return m_row; }
       set { m_row = value; }
   }
}

ColumnRules.cs

class ColumnRules: Rules
{
    private int m_column;

    public int Column
    {
        get { return m_column; }
        set { m_column = value; }
    }
}

In the main class I have

private Dictionary<int, Rules> m_testDictionary = new Dictionary<int, Rules>();
ColumnRules columnrules = new ColumnRules();
RowRules rowRules = new RowRules();

rowRules.Row = 1;
rowRules.StudyId = 1;
m_testDictionary.Add(1, rowRules);

columnRules.Column = 2;
columnRules.TimepointId = 2;
m_testDictionary.Add(2, columnRules);
foreach(.... in m_testDictionary)
{
     //Need code here.
    //if(... ==  RowRules)
      {

      }
}

Now, I need to know what value will go in the foreach loop. Also, I need to know whether that particular dictionary row is a RowRule or a ColumnRule. Hope I am clear with the question. Any help will be really appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
If you're testing for types, there's a good chance that a virtual (or abstract) method in the base class is the way to go. –  dlev Oct 26 '11 at 14:37
    
@dlev totally agree - their interface from this perspective should be the same. Only the behaviour behind that interface should be different - but the main class shouldn't know or care about that... –  MattDavey Oct 26 '11 at 14:43
1  
@Vinay I recommend you post this code to a new thread over on codereview.stackexchange.com. I'm sure you'll receive some very useful pointers on appropriate use of inheritance :) –  MattDavey Oct 26 '11 at 14:46
    
Thanks @MattDavey. Any improvements to the code is always appreciated :) –  Vinay Oct 26 '11 at 14:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should work:

foreach(KeyValuePair<int, Rules> pair in m_testDictionary)
{
    if(pair.Value is RowRule)
    {
         // do row rule stuff
    }
    if(pair.Value is ColumnRule)
    {
         // do row column rule stuff
    }
}

Here is more information on the is keyword.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I came up with an identical solution, but you got it quicker. –  Kiley Naro Oct 26 '11 at 14:40
1  
For posterity - please view this answer in conjunction with @dlev's answer below. –  MattDavey Oct 26 '11 at 16:01

There are a bunch of answers that are telling you to test the type using "is". That's fine, but in my opinion if you're switching off the type of an object, you're probably doing something wrong.

Typically, derived classes are used when you need additional and varied functionality from a base class. Moreover, ad-hoc polymorphism via virtual and abstract methods means that you can let the run-time figure out the type, leading to significantly cleaner code.

For example, in your case, you might want to make Rules an abstract class, with an abstract ApplyRule() method. Then, each subclass can implement the method, with the full knowledge of what it means to be a rule of that type:

public class Rules
{
    private int m_timepointId = 0;
    private int m_studyId = 0;

    public int TimepointId
    {
        get { return m_timepointId; }
        set { m_timepointId = value;}
    }

    public int StudyId
    {    
        get { return m_studyId; }
        set {m_studyId = value; }
    }

    // New method
    public abstract void ApplyRule();
}

class RowRules : Rules
{
   private int m_row;

   public int Row
   {
       get { return m_row; }
       set { m_row = value; }
   }

   public override void ApplyRule() { // Row specific implementation }
}

class ColumnRules : Rules
{
    private int m_column;

    public int Column
    {
        get { return m_column; }
        set { m_column = value; }
    }

   public override void ApplyRule() { // Column specific implementation }
}

Now, your loop is just:

foreach(var kvp in m_testDictionary)
{
    kvp.Value.ApplyRule();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for seeing past the simple question to the underlying problem :) –  MattDavey Oct 26 '11 at 14:50
    
I understand what you are saying here. But for my scenario, the timepointid and studyid and just 2 values. There are a bunch of them and they are all required. Only thing different will be either it belongs to a row or a column. There is not much implementation there other than loading the values to a list and leaving out either the column or row value null. –  Vinay Oct 26 '11 at 14:54

Try the following

foreach(var rule in in m_testDictionary.Values)
{
  var rowRules = rule as RowRules;
  if (rowRules != null) {
    // It's a RowRules
    continue;
  }

  var columnRules = rule as ColumnRules;
  if (columnRules != null) {
    // It's a ColumnRules
    continue;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
While this is the answer to the question, it's worth pointing out that this approach is in fact an abuse of inheritance. The containing class shouldn't need to differentiate between RowRule and ColumnRule in order to treat them differently - it violates the Liskov Substituion principle.. –  MattDavey Oct 26 '11 at 14:41

You can try this:

foreach(var key in m_testDictionary.Keys)
{
   var value = m_testDictionary[key];
   if(value is RowRules)
   {
      //test your code.....
   }
}
share|improve this answer

does that code work? You have added the same key twice I believe. This is the code you wanted I believe:

foreach(int key in m_testDictionary.Keys)
{
    RowRules row = m_testDictionary[key] as RowRules;
    if(row !=null)
      {

            //code here:)
      }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
ahh the old is-as trap! see ekrishnakumar.wordpress.com/2006/07/08/c-is-and-as-operators –  MattDavey Oct 26 '11 at 14:48
1  
The more idiomatic pattern is to have var x = otherVar as SomeType; if (x != null) { // Do stuff with x } –  dlev Oct 26 '11 at 14:49
    
Thanks Matt - I'll remember that for next time! –  Ross Dargan Oct 26 '11 at 14:51

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