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Is there a way to quickly print a ruby hash in a table format into a file? Such as:

keyA   keyB   keyC   ...
123    234    345
125           347
4456
...

where the values of the hash are arrays of different sizes. Or is using a double loop the only way?

Thanks

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2  
Easiest is a "double loop", but it's still a one-liner; is it so bad? – Dave Newton Oct 26 '11 at 14:40
    
IMO it's too specialized to be a built-in feature, and too easy to do "by hand" :) – Dave Newton Oct 26 '11 at 16:14
    
Wouldn't be bad for someone to post the easy one-liner. :-) – Larsenal Oct 26 '11 at 16:15
    
(Might be 2-3 lines depending on how the different-sized arrays need to be handled :) – Dave Newton Oct 26 '11 at 16:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a version of steenslag's that works when the arrays aren't the same size:

size = h.values.max_by { |a| a.length }.length
m    = h.values.map { |a| a += [nil] * (size - a.length) }.transpose.insert(0, h.keys)

nil seems like a reasonable placeholder for missing values but you can, of course, use whatever makes sense.

For example:

>> h = {:a => [1, 2, 3], :b => [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], :c => [9]}
>> size = h.values.max_by { |a| a.length }.length
>> m = h.values.map { |a| a += [nil] * (size - a.length) }.transpose.insert(0, h.keys)
=> [[:a, :b, :c], [1, 4, 9], [2, 5, nil], [3, 6, nil], [nil, 7, nil], [nil, 8, nil]]
>> m.each { |r| puts r.map { |x| x.nil?? '' : x }.inspect }
[:a, :b, :c]
[ 1,  4,  9]
[ 2,  5, ""]
[ 3,  6, ""]
["",  7, ""]
["",  8, ""]
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h = {:a => [1, 2, 3], :b => [4, 5, 6], :c => [7, 8, 9]}
p h.values.transpose.insert(0, h.keys)
# [[:a, :b, :c], [1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]
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1  
Works as long as the arrays are the same length. – Larsenal Oct 26 '11 at 16:29

Try this gem I wrote (prints hashes, ruby objects, ActiveRecord objects in tables): http://github.com/arches/table_print

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tp not working on a give hash, it works on an AR object. When I tried on a hash, I get this => table_print-1.0.1/lib/table_print/fingerprinter.rb:38:in `block in populate_row' – Amol Pujari Feb 21 '14 at 7:23
    
In general it does work on hashes. If it isn't working for you please open an issue at github.com/arches/table_print or email me about your problem (chris@arches.io) – Chris Doyle Feb 21 '14 at 15:43
    
error is gone after updating to the latest version, still its not the one am looking for, but for table thing, it looks the best one – Amol Pujari Feb 21 '14 at 19:31

No, there's no built-in function. Here's a code that would format it as you want it:

data = { :keyA => [123, 125, 4456], :keyB => [234000], :keyC => [345, 347] }

length = data.values.max_by{ |v| v.length }.length

widths = {}
data.keys.each do |key|
  widths[key] = 5   # minimum column width

  # longest string len of values
  val_len = data[key].max_by{ |v| v.to_s.length }.to_s.length
  widths[key] = (val_len > widths[key]) ? val_len : widths[key]

  # length of key
  widths[key] = (key.to_s.length > widths[key]) ? key.to_s.length : widths[key]
end

result = ""
data.keys.each {|key| result += key.to_s.ljust(widths[key]) + " " }
result += "\n"

for i in 0.upto(length)
  data.keys.each { |key| result += data[key][i].to_s.ljust(widths[key]) + " " }
  result += "\n"
end

# TODO write result to file...

Any comments and edits to refine the answer are very welcome.

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