Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm confused about the following integer math in python:

-7/3 = -3 since (-3)*3 = -9 < -7. I understand.

7/-3 = -3 I don't get how this is defined. (-3)*(-3) = 9 > 7. In my opinion, it should be -2, because (-3)*(-2) = 6 < 7.

How does this work?

share|improve this question
    
Python generally follows the Principle of Least Astonishment. It just always rounds down for integer division. –  Chriszuma Oct 26 '11 at 14:53
3  
Here is the rationale, straight from the bdfl himself: python-history.blogspot.com/2010/08/… –  Björn Lindqvist Oct 26 '11 at 14:56
1  
For people coming here for integer division help: In Python 3, integer division is done using //, e.g. -7 // 3 = -3 but -7 / 3 = -2.33... –  poke Oct 26 '11 at 14:57
3  
Btw. mathematically there is no real difference between -7/3 and 7/-3, so having two different results would be a bit more complicated. –  poke Oct 26 '11 at 15:00
    
@poke You can use // in Python 2 as well. –  agf Oct 26 '11 at 15:13

4 Answers 4

From the documentation:

For (plain or long) integer division, the result is an integer. The result is always rounded towards minus infinity: 1/2 is 0, (-1)/2 is -1, 1/(-2) is -1, and (-1)/(-2) is 0.

The rounding towards -inf explains the behaviour that you're seeing.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, missed that. Although I don't like it, i now see how it works. –  Jonathan Oct 26 '11 at 14:54

This is how it works:

int(x)/int(y) == math.floor(float(x)/float(y))
share|improve this answer

Expanding on the answers from aix and robert.

The best way to think of this is in terms of rounding down (towards minus infinity) the floating point result:

-7/3 = floor(-2.33) = -3

7/-3 = floor(-2.33) = -3

share|improve this answer

Python rounds down. 7/3 = 2 (2+1/3) -7/3 = -3 (-2+1/3)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.