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I'll start with piece of code:

var objectType = typeof(Department); // Department is entity class from linqdatacontext

using (var dataContext = new DataModel.ModelDataContext())
{
    var entity = Expression.Parameter(objectType, "model");
    var keyValue = Expression.Property(entity, "Id");
    var pkValue = Expression.Constant(reader.Value);
    var cond = Expression.Equal(keyValue, pkValue);
    var table = dataContext.GetTable(objectType);
    ... // and here i don't how to proceed
}

I am not even sure if i am building that expression correctly. However simply put, i need to call dynamically SingleOrDefault() on that table to find entity by primary key. Every example i had found is using generic variant of GetTable<>(), but i cannot use that obviously. I am probably overlooking something...

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Why not just make this code itself generic? –  Jon Hanna Oct 26 '11 at 15:22
    
Well i don't want that, because i have there like 30 entities that i need to retrieve with this. That would be sort of messy and tiresome. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 15:26
    
But if the code itself is generic, then you still need just one method, unless I'm missing something. (In which case dynamic is perhaps the solution, but I still don't see why here). –  Jon Hanna Oct 26 '11 at 15:31
    
I don't know much about dynamic keyword. Where do you see any generic code ? I have just classic Type there and value of primary key, nothing more. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 15:42
1  
Ah, so in the "real" version, the setting of objectType is elsewhere in code. Yes, that'll stop generics working for you if the calling code doesn't have an appropriate instance or is able to hard-code the type. Look at @SteveDanner 's answer then, the use of dynamic in the Where shows how to call properties without compile-time knowledge of the type. This will be useful later on, though I think your problem is slightly different. –  Jon Hanna Oct 26 '11 at 15:49
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Whenever I build expression trees, I like to start off with an example of what I'm building:

() => dataContext.GetTable<TEntity>().SingleOrDefault(entity => entity.Id == 1);

From that, we can easily dissect the target expression. You are partway there; you just need to include a call to the GetTable method in the expression tree and then build an outer lambda expression to call the whole thing:

using(var dataContext = new DataModel.ModelDataContext())
{
    var getTableCall = Expression.Call(
        Expression.Constant(dataContext),
        "GetTable",
        new[] { entityType });

    var entity = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "entity");

    var idCheck = Expression.Equal(
        Expression.Property(entity, "Id"),
        Expression.Constant(reader.Value));

    var idCheckLambda = Expression.Lambda(idCheck, entity);

    var singleOrDefaultCall = Expression.Call(
        typeof(Queryable),
        "SingleOrDefault",
        new[] { entityType },
        getTableCall,
        Expression.Quote(idCheckLambda));

    var singleOrDefaultLambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<object>>(
        Expression.Convert(singleOrDefaultCall, typeof(object)));

    var singleOrDefaultFunction = singleOrDefaultLambda.Compile();

    return singleOrDefaultFunction();    
}

We have to convert the SingleOrDefault call to have a return type of object so it can serve as the body of the Func<object> function.

(Untested)

Edit: Parameterizing the data context and value

Now we are building this function:

(dataContext, value) => dataContext.GetTable<TEntity>().SingleOrDefault(entity => entity.Id == value);

You would change the constants to parameters and add those parameters to the function you compile:

var dataContextParameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(ModelDataContext), "dataContext");

var valueParameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(object), "value");

var getTableCall = Expression.Call(
    dataContextParameter,
    "GetTable",
    new[] { entityType });

var entity = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "entity");

var idCheck = Expression.Equal(
    Expression.Property(entity, "Id"),
    valueParameter);

var idCheckLambda = Expression.Lambda(idCheck, entity);

var singleOrDefaultCall = Expression.Call(
    typeof(Queryable),
    "SingleOrDefault",
    new[] { entityType },
    getTableCall,
    Expression.Quote(idCheckLambda));

var singleOrDefaultLambda =
    Expression.Lambda<Func<ModelDataContext, object, object>>(
        Expression.Convert(singleOrDefaultCall, typeof(object)),
        dataContextParameter,
        valueParameter);

var singleOrDefaultFunction = singleOrDefaultLambda.Compile();

// Usage

using(var dataContext = new DataModel.ModelDataContext())
{
    return singleOrDefaultFunction(dataContext, reader.Value);    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that looks nasty :) I will definitely try it later, i need to do some errands now. I will let you know than if it worked. Thanks. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 16:04
    
Ok, it works fine, thank you very much. Now i am thinking about some optimization, because there will be a lot of calls to this and compiling this every time can go bad. And there is also problem with that dataContext being disposed at the end of using, so it cannot be used like constant. I am trying something with Expression.Variable, but not sure how to use it properly. It would be great to have precompiled function where can put parameters with dataContext and Value and than execute it to retrieve result. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 21:00
1  
@FredyC: I updated my answer with a parameterized version. –  Bryan Watts Oct 26 '11 at 21:20
    
You are genius :) Thank you, that's exactly what i need. Although it goes bad in making Expression.Equal because Id property is type of Int32 and i am passing object there. But that's no big deal, i can manage that, in this case it's good enough. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 21:42
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If you are using .NET 4, you could try casting your returned objects as dynamic, so you could then query like this.

using (var dataContext = new DataModel.ModelDataContext())
{
   var entity = Expression.Parameter(objectType, "model");
   var keyValue = Expression.Property(entity, "Id");
   var pkValue = Expression.Constant(reader.Value);
   var cond = Expression.Equal(keyValue, pkValue);
   var table = dataContext.GetTable(objectType);

   var result = table.Where(ent => ((dynamic)ent).SomeField == "SomeValue");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, i am using .NET 4. That would be nice, but problem starts at table variable. There is no Where method, because it's no typed or for some other reason. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 15:29
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I'm still not entirely sure as to the whole of your problem (and I suspect the answer about dynamic is going to solve part of what will come up too). Still, just to answer:

Every example i had found is using generic variant of GetTable<>(), but i cannot use that obviously

For any T, Table<T> implements (among other interfaces) ITable<T> and ITable. The former is generically typed, the latter not.

The form GetTable<T>() returns such a Table<T>. However, the form GetTable(Type t) returns an ITable. Since ITable inherits from IQueryable you can query it. If you need to do something with that query that would normally require knowledge of the type (such as comparing on a given property) then dynamic as per the previous answer given by Steve Danner allows that to happen.

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Ok, but i am still probably missing something in this. How can i query IQueryable without knowing type there ? When i use generic GetTable<T>, than i get possible methods like Where and Select. But with non-generic GetTable(Type t) there is nothing. I don't how could i use dynamic in there (mostly because that keyword is still unknown for me) –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 16:16
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I'd do it using Reflection and the LINQ dynamic query library, personally.

You can get the list of all the keys for a table with dataContext.Mapping.GetMetaType(objectType).IdentityMembers, then access the data with something along the lines of dataContext.GetTable(objectType).Where(key.Name + "==@0", id).

Obviously, I left out a few steps in there - if you have multiple keys, you'll need to build a fuller predicate with a loop over .IdentityMembers, and if you always just have the one key, you can use .First() on it. I haven't tested it either, but it should be pretty close. It'd probably be 6-7 lines of code total - I can write it up (and test) if you need it.


Edit: The LINQ Dynamic Query Library can be downloaded from Microsoft at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/bb894665.aspx - just include DynamicLINQ.cs in your project and you're good.

share|improve this answer
    
Still the same problem. Non generic version of GetTable does not has the Where method. –  FredyC Oct 26 '11 at 17:21
    
@FredyC: I forgot that I had installed a separate LINQ Dynamic Query Library. Oops. Link to it has been added. –  Bobson Oct 26 '11 at 17:41
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