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I searched similar requests/questions, but nothing seems to match my situation.

I use a PHP file to send/output uploaded files to the browser. I call the PHP file a "reader" file. The following is a boiled down version of the reader (with additional file types removed for simplicity):

<?php
    if($_GET['upload']){ // for files uploaded via CMS uploader
        $file = $site_directory . $uploads_path . $_GET['upload'];
    }
    if (file_exists($file)) {
        header('Content-Description: File Transfer');
        // JPG
        if(strstr($file,".jpg"))
        {
            header('Content-type: image/jpeg');
            header('Content-Disposition: inline; filename='.basename($file));
        // OTHER FILE TYPES
        }else   
        {
            header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');
            header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename='.basename($file));
        }
        header('Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary');
        header('Expires: 0');
        header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0');
        header('Pragma: public');
        header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($file));
        ob_clean();
        flush();
        readfile($file);
        exit;
    }else{
        echo "<p>That file does not exist.</p>";
    }
?>

As you'll see in the following example, it generally works. But when the browser has to load several images this way, some won't load/appear as broken. You can see an example of it in action here: http://www.technotarek.com/index.php?id=25&view=grid. If you don't see any broken images in the photo grid at first, try a few hard refreshes.

Any ideas why this isn't reliable for multiple files/images?

Note that I have an additional script that re-sizes the images on the example, but that is not the culprit. I removed it and the problem remained.

More Background (on why I'm using this method): I originally started using the reader script/file on sites where the server admins didn't allow uploads to the webserver, but instead required all user uploads to be stored on a separate sandlot server. The "reader" file allows me to access and output those files, because a direct URL to the sandlot files is not possible.

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If you are loading multiple images in parallel, then you might run out of allowed processes or memory (on shared hosting anyway). But this is hard to say definitely. Try running concurrent curl requests from the commandline to debug. –  mario Oct 26 '11 at 15:50
    
Yes, this is sitting on a shared hosting platform. Might you know away to help manage the processes/memory within my script? And/or, could you provide any more guidance re the curl debugging suggestion? Many thanks. –  technoTarek Oct 26 '11 at 15:53
    
Note that your script will happily serve up ANY file on the server. http://example.com/script.php?upload=../../../../../../../../seekrit.passwords‌​. Hope you don't have anything you want to keep private. –  Marc B Oct 26 '11 at 16:02
    
Per my post: "I originally started using the reader script/file on sites where the server admins didn't allow uploads to the webserver, but instead required all user uploads to be stored on a separate sandlot server. The "reader" file allows me to access and output those files, because a direct URL to the sandlot files is not possible." I'm now using it universally to avoid having to run different routines whether or not a sandlot is in use. I'll look into X-Sendfile. Thanks again. –  technoTarek Oct 26 '11 at 16:02
    
@MarcB Thanks, but that only works when the script is used as published in my request. For this purpose (only), I removed a bunch of security measures to simply things. –  technoTarek Oct 26 '11 at 16:44
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1 Answer

If your indirect-download script just serves to add header, then investiage if you can use:

To reduce script load, an alternative to readfile would be: mod_xsendfile and the X-Sendfile: header, so the Apache process handles the reading/sending. (Should be possible if the files are mapped somehow via a network filesystem.)

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The full script does a little more. It first detects if a sandlot is in use for the site in question (via a site config setting). It then dynamically builds the file path based on that config and then sends along the file. Because of that, I think the script is necessary. Also, this is running on Apache and IIS servers, so it sounds like I'd then have to script out two different versions based on the platform with the X-Sendfile approach. I'll continue to look into the process/memory management...any other leads you have on that front would be much appreciated. –  technoTarek Oct 26 '11 at 17:11
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