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I have a function which needs to be invoked with a different number of threads each time (am doing some performance calculation, so need to know when the performance starts deteriorating). Example is given below:

getTime() {
    return 0;
}

int main() {
    boost::threadpool::thread_pool<> threads(nThreads);

    for(int j = 0; j <= nLines; j++){
        threads.schedule(boost::bind(&getTime, nThreads, 1));
    }

    threads.wait();
}

Where, nThreads: A value given at the command line

My question is, would this give me the desired result, as to would this call the 'getTime' function with 'nThreads' each time the for loop is accessed by the program? Or do I need some other method to find out the same?

what i really want to do is this:

boost::threadpool::thread_pool<> threads(nThreads); 
// start a new thread that calls the "getTime" function 
for(int j = 0; j <= nLines; j++){ 
    //threads.schedule(boost::bind(&getTime, nThreads, 1));
    threads.schedule(boost::bind(&getTime, 0, nLines, pc)); 
}

(not sure which of the above is correct.)

the getTime() function is to be run with a specified number of lines which i get from a text file and give each line to a api, whose performance i wish to calculate. but this is unrelated to the question i have.

i wish to call a function with different number of threads each time and calculate how much time it took each thread to finish. what was the total time taken with 1 thread, what was the total time taken by 2 threads to finish, etc.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If i understand correctly, what you really want to do is something like this :

int main() 
{
    int nbThreads = 20;
    boost::threadpool::thread_pool<> threads(nbThreads);

    for(int threadId = 0; threadId <= nbThreads ; ++threadId)
    {
        threads.schedule(getTime);
    }
    threads.wait();  
}

If i am right, you don't need to use boost::bind here.

Note that Boost.ThreadPool is not part of Boost (yet? it ). It will be reviewed, but no review date has been planned yet.

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sorry my bad. did not state that i want to have the process run for multiple different values, which are stored in that line variable and initialized in getTime(). Hence the requirement for a FOR loop. what you have given would mean another FOR loop inside the one i gave. correct me if wrong? –  gagneet Apr 26 '09 at 10:49
    
I am sorry, i still don't get it right i guess. What i do understand is that you want to do some work (i don't know exactly what) and distribute it under a provided number of threads. This work seems to be nbLines calls to the getTime function, but i am not sure. And i don't know how you want to use nbLines in all this. Please try and be more precise ! –  Benoît Apr 26 '09 at 13:25
    
i have edited the main question. do inform if the requirement is still unclear. –  gagneet Apr 27 '09 at 15:37
    
Could you post some (nearly) working code that does some work within one thread only ? That would be clearer... –  Benoît Apr 27 '09 at 20:58

What about using something like OpenMP? If scalability is your goal, it's probably a better choice.

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