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I am in a beginner java programming class and currently reviewing loops. If there is one thing I just do not understand, it's pyramids. I have researched the book exercises online and found the solutions to the pyramid examples, but even seeing the code, I still don't understand and couldn't recreate the answers if my life depended on it.

Below is a pyramid example and the code that creates it. If someone could walk through the code and give me a line by line 'for dummies' explanation of what is going on then maybe I'll finally understand.

Thanks in advance for you help!

ex. create the following pyramid:

            1
          2 1 2
        3 2 1 2 3
      4 3 2 1 2 3 4
    5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5   
  6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6    
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
class Pyramid {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int x = 7;

        for (int i = 1; i <= x; i++) {

            for (int j = 1; j <= x - i; j++)
                System.out.print("   ");

            for (int k = i; k >= 1; k--)
                System.out.print((k >= 10) ?+ k : "  " + k);

            for (int k = 2; k <=i; k++)
                System.out.print((k >= 10) ?+ k : "  " + k);
            System.out.println();
        }  
    }
}
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9  
I'd strongly recommend taking a pencil and paper and "playing" computer: trace the code's execution (for a lower value of x, like 3). Effort spent now will reap long-term benefits. –  Dave Newton Oct 26 '11 at 16:20
5  
You'd almost certainly find the code easier to understand if you intended it appropriately, and made all loops use braces. –  Jon Skeet Oct 26 '11 at 16:21
    
I doubt that you actually wanted to use that "Pyramid" tag, as 'Pyramid' is a Python-based web framework. Also, (just so I can correct Jon Skeet) "indented it" not "intended it" :-) –  Bob2Chiv Oct 26 '11 at 16:22
1  
install eclipse, learn how to debug in eclipse and then do debug for your code. That way you will have learned something when you reach a software industry –  Naveen Babu Oct 26 '11 at 16:23
    
@Babu That debugger tip is quite good. Let's you understand what's happening to the variables. –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 16:34

4 Answers 4

well I made a similar program with no issues and just imagination... the code is so clear :D

private void jButton1ActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {                                         
    int i,j,k, n = Integer.parseInt(jTextField1.getText());
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++) // normal loop
    { 
        for(j=1; j<=(n-i);j++)
        {
            System.out.print(" "); // loop for spaces
        }
        for(k=1;k<=i;k++) // loop for printing numbers
        {
            System.out.print(k+" ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }    // TODO add your handling code here:
}
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public static void main(String[] args) {

    // levels in the pyramid
    int x = 5;

    for (int i = 1; i <= x; i++) {
        // for spacing
        for (int j = 1; j <= x - i; j++){                System.out.print("   ");            }           // left half of the pyramid             for (int k = i; k >= 1; k--){
            System.out.print((k >= 10) ? +k : "  " + k);
        }
        // corresponding right half of the pyramid
        for (int k = 2; k <= i; k++) {               System.out.print((k >= 10) ? +k : "  " + k);
        }
        // next line
        System.out.println();
    }
}

Credit: http://www.skilledmonster.com/2013/10/28/java-pyramid-example-pattern-11/

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It begins by declaring x to be 7. Then a for loop starts. This loop is going to start off by saying a variable i to be 1. Its contents (the code block starting with { and ending with the corresponding }) will be run as long as the for loop's second part (i <= x) evaluates to true. At the end of such an execution, the last part is going to be performed: i++, which increments variable i by one.

So what happens is:

  • i set to 1
  • i <= x ?
    • Yes! 1 is smaller than or equal to 7. Do the stuff in the code block.
  • i goes from 1 to 2
  • i <= x ?
    • Yes! 2 is smaller than or equal to 7. Do the stuff in the code block.
  • ... several iterations ...
  • i goes from 7 to 8
    • i <= x ?
    • No! 8 is not smaller than or equal to 7. For loop ends.

That's the outer loop. Now, we'll need to figure out what happens in one such iteration of the for loop. So let's look at that code block which gets executed 7 times.

for (int j = 1; j <= x - i; j++)  
System.out.print("   "); 

for (int k = i; k >= 1; k--)  
System.out.print((k >=10) ?+ k : "  " + k);  

for (int k = 2; k <=i; k++)  
System.out.print((k>= 10) ?+ k : "  " + k);  
System.out.println();  

There's three logical parts here, conveniently separated by a blank line. What may be confusing here is that these three parts are in the outer for loop's code block, but are not nested any deeper. Take a look at this first one:

for (int j = 1; j <= x - i; j++)  
System.out.print("   "); 

This time there's no { or } to delimit what is part of the for's code block. By default, this means only the next statement is part of it, or in this case System.out.print(" ");.

What happens in that bit of code? Well, it's another for, this time starting from 1 and running until x - i. x is still 7, but i depends on which iteration of the outer for loop we're in. First time round it'll be 1. That will correspond to the first row you see in the output. Second time round it'll be 2. That will correspond to the second row of the output.

So suppose this is the first iteration of the outer for loop. x - i is then really 7 - 1, which is 6. We let some variable j go from 1 to 6. Each of these 6 times, we're printing out 3 space characters.

After that, we arrive at the second part:

for (int k = i; k >= 1; k--)  
System.out.print((k >=10) ?+ k : "  " + k); 

Another for loop, but with a twist. This one uses a variable k that starts at i and then counts down to 1, as indicated by the k--. For each of these iterations, it prints out more stuff to the output. The content of the print statement is a bit more complex this time. It uses a ternary operator. That first bit (k >=10) is going to be evaluated. If it is true, it'll return the bit before :, otherwise it'll return the bit after :. In this case, it means that if k is larger than or equal to 10, it'll print out just k's value. Otherwise, it'll print out two spaces plus k's value.

After this, the last bit should be easy to figure out. Notice that after the for loop and its single statement, there's a System.out.println(); All this does is print out a line break, making the output go to the next line.

That marks the end of one iteration of the outer for loop. As long as i is nog larger than x (7 in our case), another iteration will start and those three parts are gonna run. Since those three inner for loops are dependent on i, they're always gonna run a different amount of times.

Mentally do the following: go through at least three iterations of the outer for loop. That means, think of i being 1 and mentally execute the stuf between { and }. Then think of i being 2 and do the same. Do it again for 3 and by now it should start to become clear.

Good luck!

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Thanks G_H! I really appreciate the time you took to spell this out for me. I think your explanation may help me finally get this. –  user1011064 Oct 26 '11 at 16:48
    
It's not an explanation that focuses on the program's intent, rather just something that tells you what goes on in the code. It's up to you to see how this achieves the result you see. NickLH's explanation's gonna help with that. Remember: programming languages bridge the gap between your mind and a computer's :) –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 16:52

There are 7 rows in the pyramid, so the first for loop is looping over the rows, the second for loop is printing a bunch of spaces so that the triangle doesnt appear as:

1
2 1 2
3 2 1 2 3

The third for loop (with k), has a conditional operator which works like this:

boolean-expression ? result-if-true : result-if-false

So it either adds the number k to the string, or adds a space and then the number k to the string.

Fourth loop does a similar thing.

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1  
Well, scrapping my answer as you beat me to it. I just want to add that the second inner loop counts down for the left side up to and including the 1, and the second inner loop counts up from 1 (not including it) for the right side of the pyramid. –  Brandon Buck Oct 26 '11 at 16:31

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