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I have standard databindings setup for all my TextBoxes to an Object like this:

TextBoxMenuID.DataBindings.Add("Text", _selectedObject, "ID");

And I want to bind some of my TextBoxes to a List<> index within that Object like this:

TextBoxQ1.DataBindings.Add("Text", _selectedObject._qList[0].QuestionString, null);

The binding isn't working this way. Any ideas how to go about this kind of binding?

Thanks, SleffTheRed

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How does it work if you use the first snippet you provided but in the code you also assign to selectedObject the object of the item in position 0 of your list you used in the second snippet? –  Davide Piras Oct 26 '11 at 16:26
    
How am I assigning the item in position 0 of the list to the selected object? –  Sleff Oct 26 '11 at 16:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Credit to Mitja for the code, but to change the index just add []'s:

list = new List<Person>();
list.Add(new Person { ID = 1, Name = "Name 1", Age = 21 });
list.Add(new Person { ID = 2, Name = "Name 2", Age = 28 });
list.Add(new Person { ID = 3, Name = "Name 3", Age = 44 });

textBox1.DataBindings.Add(new Binding("Text", list[0], "Name", false));
textBox2.DataBindings.Add(new Binding("Text", list[1], "Name", false));
textBox3.DataBindings.Add(new Binding("Text", list[2], "Name", false));

internal class Person
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

enter image description here

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Excellent KreeN, thanks. I was just missing the "name". –  Sleff Oct 26 '11 at 17:51

If you are using a generic list as a collection of data, then you can do it like:

List<Person> list;
public Form1()
{
   InitializeComponent();
   list = new List<Person>();
   list.Add(new Person { ID = 1, Name = "Name 1", Age = 21 });
   list.Add(new Person { ID = 2, Name = "Name 2", Age = 28 });

   textBox1.DataBindings.Add(new Binding("Text", list, "ID", false));
   textBox2.DataBindings.Add(new Binding("Text", list, "Name", false));
   textBox3.DataBindings.Add(new Binding("Text", list, "Age", false));
}

internal class Person
{
   public int ID { get; set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public int Age { get; set; }
}
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He does not need different properties but different objects... –  Davide Piras Oct 26 '11 at 16:57
    
Yes Mitja, thanks for the answer, but Davide is right. I actually need the 3 text boxes you used as an example to bind to: textBox1 -> bound to "Name 1", textBox2 -> bound to "Name 2" for example. –  Sleff Oct 26 '11 at 17:16
    
+1 so I could copy your code Mitja, but Sleff, see the code I pasted up top to do that, its very simple. –  KreepN Oct 26 '11 at 17:27

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