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I have a problem that I managed to solve with a work around so I am here hoping to learn from you more elegant solutions ;-)

I have to parse the output of a program: it writes a file of three columns x y z like this

1 1 11  
1 2 12  
1 3 13  
1 4 14  
2 1 21  
2 2 22  
2 3 23  
2 4 24  
3 1 31  
3 2 32  
3 3 33  
3 4 34  
4 1 41  
4 2 42  
4 3 43  
4 4 44  

in a matrix like this

11 12 13 14  
21 22 23 24  
31 32 33 34  
41 42 43 44  

I solved with a two line bash script like this

dim_matrix=$(awk 'END{print sqrt(NR)}' file_xyz) #since I know that the matrix has to be squared and there are no blank lines in the file_xyz  
awk '{printf("%s%s",$3, !(NR%'${dim_matrix}'==0) ? OFS :ORS ) }' file_xyz  

Can you please suggest me a way to perform the same only with awk?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

awk does not do real multidimensional arrays, but you can fake it with a properly constructed string:

awk '
  {mx[$1 "," $2] = $3}
  END {
    size=sqrt(NR)
    for (x=1; x<=size; x++) {
      for (y=1; y<=size; y++)
          printf("%s ",mx[x "," y])
      print ""
    }
  }
' filename

You can accomplish your example with a single awk call and a call to wc

awk -v "nlines=$(wc -l < filename)" '
  BEGIN {size = sqrt(nlines)}
  {printf("%s%s", $3, (NR % size == 0 ? ORS : OFS))
}' filename
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thank You very much! This really helped me! –  Mareczek Oct 26 '11 at 20:27
    
May be I found a shorter script... awk ' {arr[c++]=$3} END{ size=sqrt(NR) for (c=0;c<NR;c++) {printf("%s%s", arr[c], (c % size == (size - 1) ? ORS : OFS) )} }' file_xyz Anyway it is really difficult to me understanding awk... I am not still able to write down a few lines by myself I just copy other scripts and try to figure out how they works –  Mareczek Oct 26 '11 at 21:18
1  
The key for me about awk is the layout of the script: condition {body} condition {body} ... -- the body will only execute if the given condition is true. A blank condition means the body will be executed for every line. A blank body is implicitly {print $0}. –  glenn jackman Oct 27 '11 at 12:53

i am not totally sure what you try do, try this:

awk 'NR%4==0{print s " " $NF;s="";next}{s=s?s " " $NF:$NF}' file1

HTH Chris

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the command dint work in Solaris' awk ... it works beautifully with nawk thought .... –  tomkaith13 Oct 26 '11 at 18:36
    
@Chris I didn't want to write explisicitly the number of rows of the file_xyz I would like awk will do it, store this number in memory and use it to format the matrix file... sorry for poor explanations ;-) thanks –  Mareczek Oct 26 '11 at 20:20

A "not so" readable version:

awk '($0=$NF x)&&ORS=NR%4?FS:RS' infile

Parameters added as per OP's request:

awk '
  ($0 = $NF x) && ORS = NR % n ? FS : RS
  ' n="$1" infile

In the script above I'm using $1, but you can use any shell variable.

The explanation follows:

$0 = $NF - set $0 (the entire current input record) to the current value of the last field ($NF).

ORS = NR % n ? FS : RS - using the ternary operator:

expression ? return_this_if_true : return_this_otherwise,

set the OutputRecordSeparator to:

  • when NR % n evaluates true (i.e. returns value different than 0) set ORS to the current value of FS (FieldSeparator - runs of white space characters by default)

  • otherwise set it to RS (which defaults to a newline)

The x (an unitialized variable and thus a NULL string when used in concatenation) is needed in order to handle correctly the output when the last field is 0 (or an empty string). This is because the assignement statement in awk actually in this case returns the assigned value, if $NF is 0, the rest of the && boolean statement will be ignored.

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great! Can You also let the script do all the job so that I do not have to write explicitly NR%4 ? I will also appreciate very much if You can explain me how this line of awk works. Thank You very much! –  Mareczek Oct 27 '11 at 13:56
1  
@Mariano, parameters and comments added. –  Dimitre Radoulov Oct 27 '11 at 14:08
    
Thank You very much Dimitre, I really appreciate your answer –  Mareczek Oct 29 '11 at 23:12

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