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Forgive me in advance if this question is a little too open-ended, but I've seen similar language discussion posts here so I figured I'd take the plunge.

Anyway, I have read several MSDN help pages and various other blogs on the subject of properly implementing IDisposable classes. I feel like I understand things pretty well, but I have to wonder if there's a flaw in the suggested class structure:

public class DisposableBase : IDisposable
{
    private bool mDisposed;

    ~DisposableBase()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!mDisposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                // Dispose managed resources
                mManagedObject.Dispose();
            }

            // Dispose unmanaged resources
            CloseHandle(mUnmanagedHandle);
            mUnmanagedHandle = IntPtr.Zero;

            mDisposed = true;
        }
    }
}

Anytime the above is supposed to serve as a base class, you rely on the implementer of the subclass to properly override the Dispose(bool) method where necessary. In short, derived classes must ensure they invoke the base Dispose(bool) method from within their overridden version. If not, the base class' unmanaged resources may never get freed, defeating the primary purpose of the IDisposable interface.

We all know the benefits of virtual methods, but it seems like in this case their design falls short. In fact, I think this particular shortcoming of virtual methods manifests itself frequently when trying to design visual components and similar base/derived class structures.

Consider the following change, using a protected event rather than a protected virtual method:

public class DisposeEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public bool Disposing { get; protected set; }

    public DisposeEventArgs(bool disposing)
    {
        Disposing = disposing;
    }
}

public class DisposableBase : IDisposable
{
    private bool mDisposed;

    protected event EventHandler<DisposeEventArgs> Disposing;

    ~DisposableBase()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    // This method is now private rather than protected virtual
    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!mDisposed)
        {
            // Allow subclasses to react to disposing event
            AtDisposing(new DisposeEventArgs(disposing));

            if (disposing)
            {
                // Dispose managed resources
                mManagedObject.Dispose();
            }

            // Dispose unmanaged resources
            CloseHandle(mUnmanagedHandle);
            mUnmanagedHandle = IntPtr.Zero;

            mDisposed = true;
        }
    }

    private void AtDisposing(DisposeEventArgs args)
    {
        try
        {
            EventHandler<DisposeEventArgs> handler = Disposing;
            if (handler != null) handler(this, args);
        }
        catch
        {
        }
    }
}

With this design, the base class' Dispose(bool) method will always be called, regardless of whether subclasses subscribe to the Disposing event or not. The biggest flaw that I can see with this revised setup is that there is no predetermined order for when event listeners are called. This could be problematic if there are multiple levels of inheritance, e.g. SubclassA's listener might be triggered before its child SubclassB's listener. Is this flaw serious enough to invalidate my revised design?

This design dilemma makes me wish there were some sort of modifier for methods that was similar to virtual but which would ensure that the base class' method was always called, even if a subclass overrode that function. If there's a better way to achieve this, I would greatly appreciate your suggestions.

share|improve this question
1  
I think it's reasonable to require as part of the contract of the method that your deriving classes call the base implementation, as specified, particularly with a method like Dispose where the contract is fairly clear. Better yet, architect your solution so that the Disposable class is sealed and you don't have to bother with the whole Dispose(bool) mess. –  Dan Bryant Oct 26 '11 at 17:17
2  
But is it a real problem? Owning a resource and not being sealed (sealable) ought to be rare. I would rather use Unit tests. –  Henk Holterman Oct 26 '11 at 17:18
    
Use one of the SafeHandle classes, problem solved. –  Hans Passant Oct 26 '11 at 17:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're using an event here when really you want to use an inheritance mechanism like virtual. For scenarios like this where I want to ensure my implementation is always called but want to allow for base class customization I use the following pattern

private void Dispose(bool disposing)
  if (mDisposed) { 
    return;
  }

  if (disposing) {
    mManagedObject.Dispose();
  }

  // Dispose unmanaged resources
  CloseHandle(mUnmanagedHandle);
  mUnmanagedHandle = IntPtr.Zero;
  mDisposed = true;

  DisposeCore(disposing);
}

protected virtual void DisposeCore(bool disposing) {
  // Do nothing by default
}

With this pattern I've ensured my base class Dispose implementation will always be called. Derived classes can't stop me by simply forgetting to call a base method. They can still opt into the dispose pattern by overriding DisposeCore but they can't break the base class contract.

share|improve this answer
    
It'll work but is it worth deviating from the reference implementation? –  Henk Holterman Oct 26 '11 at 17:14
    
@HenkHolterman IMHO yes. If the reference sample doesn't adequately fulfill my constraints I deviate as necessary. –  JaredPar Oct 26 '11 at 17:21
    
I like this idea, and it's certainly less code than using an event. If there is more than one level of inheritance, however, couldn't this still suffer from the same original problem (i.e. a grandchild not properly calling its parent's DisposeCore method)? –  Jeremy Oct 26 '11 at 17:34
    
@Jeremy yes. It gets annoying because you have to get creative with names. However I generally keep my hierarchies pretty short so it's not much of a problem. –  JaredPar Oct 26 '11 at 17:42
    
I think for my specific question, what others have said here is most correct. It's gotta be better to use a SafeHandle class if possible, or at the very least just make a simple sealed class to wrap around an unmanaged resource. Regardless, I appreciate your answer, though it still leaves me wishing for some other language inheritance mechanism where the base class method is always invoked, overridden or not. =/ –  Jeremy Oct 26 '11 at 17:56

The derived class can simply re-implement IDisposable and thus prevent your dispose method from being called, so you can't ensure that either.

Personally I wouldn't use either pattern. I prefer building on SafeHandle and similar mechanisms, instead of implementing finalizers myself.

share|improve this answer
1  
You could remove the finalizer part from the question and it would still stand. –  Henk Holterman Oct 26 '11 at 17:25
    
I never considered that, and it seems making IDisposable classes is fraught with issues. I just happened across this very detailed post: IDisposable: What Your Mother Never Told You About Resource Deallocation. In addition to pointing out all sorts of issues with the current IDisposable issue, I think he essentially makes the same suggestion you do. –  Jeremy Oct 26 '11 at 17:42
    
@Jeremy SafeHandle eliminates the destructor, not your inheritance problem. –  Henk Holterman Oct 26 '11 at 18:50
    
@HenkHolterman Yes, I initially didn't understand quite what you were saying, but you're absolutely right. Even if my base class doesn't have any unmanaged resources, if it has any IDisposable fields of its own, it should implement IDisposable as well and we run right into the same issue, no? –  Jeremy Oct 26 '11 at 19:13

Consider making it apparent that Dispose is not being called so someone will catch it. Of course Debug.WriteLine will only be called when the code is compiled with DEBUG compiler directive defined.

public class DisposableBase : IDisposable
{
  private bool mDisposed;

  ~DisposableBase()
  {
      if (!mDisposed)
         System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine ("Object not disposed: " + this + "(" + GetHashCode() + ")";
      Dispose(false);
  }

  public void Dispose()
  {
      Dispose(true);
      GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Can you safely access Debug.WriteLine in a finalizer? (Even if not, I've read that you can still safely write to Console.Out in finalizers, so your point still stands) –  Jeremy Oct 26 '11 at 17:19
    
I think so, but what are you concerned about? The finalizer thread should have access to Debug.WriteLine (). –  agent-j Oct 26 '11 at 17:20

You can break it down:

  • A destructor (finalizer) is only needed for unmanaged resources.
  • Using a Safehandle can turn an unmanged resource into a managed resource.
  • Ergo: You won't need a destructor. That halves the Dispose pattern.

The reference design uses a virtual void Dispose(bool) to cater for the Base/Derived class problem. This puts the burden on the derived class to call base.Dispose(disposing), the core of your question. I use 2 approaches:

1) Prevent it. With a sealed base-class you won't have to worry.

sealed class Foo:IDisposable 
{ 
   void Dispose() { _member.Dispose(); } 
}

2) Check it. Like @j-agent's answer but conditional. When performance could be an issue then you don't want the finalizers in Production code:

class Foo:IDisposable 
{ 
  void Dispose() { Dispose(true); }

  [Conditional("TEST")]  // or "DEBUG"
  ~Foo { throw new InvalidOperation("somebody forgot to Dispose") } 
}
share|improve this answer

The destructor is going to be called no matter if any subclass overrides Dispose() (can be via override or new) but your destructor is going to be called ( ~DisposableBase() ) so i bet putting your logic for cleanup there can be a good starting point.

Here is an intersting article about destructors: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/chandrahundigam/UnderstandingDestructors11192005021208AM/UnderstandingDestructors.aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
Though the syntax is (unfortunately) the same as a C++ destructor, a finalizer method is not a destructor; mixing the terminology leads to confusion. Also, if GC.SuppressFinalize is called, the finalizer will not be called. Further, the runtime makes no guarantee that the finalizer will ever be called, though, in practice, it generally will be. –  Dan Bryant Oct 26 '11 at 17:24
    
Thats true, @DanBryant but i think here the question boils down to the use of the code he is writing, if he is writing an internal library then it's not a problem because you can specify that nobody should call GC.SupressFinalize now, if it is a public library then you have no guarantee of how users are going to make use of your IDisposable implementation. –  VoidMain Oct 26 '11 at 19:46
    
@Dan Bryant: To be pedantic, a C# destructor is a piece of code which will be called from compiler-generated wrapper. The syntax is similar to the C++ destructor, even though the semantic meaning is totally different. A C# destructor isn't quite the same thing as an override of Finalize, since the former includes some (perhaps silly) wrapper code. If overriding Finalize() were permitted, I'd suggest that programmers do that and pretend C# destructors don't exist, since they add nothing to portability or expressiveness. Nonetheless, they exist and "destructor" is alas the only accurate term. –  supercat Oct 26 '11 at 21:10
    
@Dan Bryant: Of course, to the extent that most things which are true of finalizers are true of C# destructors, one can (and should) use the term "finalizer" in most places where one might use the term "destructor". There are, though, some slight differences between finalizers and C# destructors, so both terms must be part of the lexicon. –  supercat Oct 26 '11 at 21:12

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