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I have the following script which works:

x=10
echo $x
now=$(date +'%Y-%m-%d')
echo $now

However, when I add a comment line at the beginning:

# comment
x=10
echo $x
now=$(date +'%Y-%m-%d')
echo $now

I get the following:

x=10: command not found
x: undefined variable

Why is the addition of the comment causing the script to fail?

if I do the following it works:

x=10
echo $x
now=$(date +'%Y-%m-%d')
# comment here
echo $now
share|improve this question
1  
Does that script have a #! shebang as its first line, or is just the bare commands? – Marc B Oct 26 '11 at 17:15
    
No it does not. – John B Oct 26 '11 at 17:16
    
Did you maybe wind up with DOS-style line endings in the file? – derobert Oct 26 '11 at 17:16
    
Don't know. I am using vi to write the script – John B Oct 26 '11 at 17:18
    
The #! did not seem to change anything – John B Oct 26 '11 at 17:20
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a quirk of csh. (Stop using csh!) csh will process a script that does not begin with a '#' using a "standard shell" (quoting from the csh manpage.) When the script begins with '#', csh parses it. Your script is not valid csh.

You should probably add a shebang line to avoid this type of issue. That is, make the first line:

#!/bin/sh
share|improve this answer
    
what is csh and how to I stop using it? – John B Oct 26 '11 at 17:30
    
@JohnB: You can change your shell by running chsh. What is csh? csh is evil. man csh may give a less biased description. – derobert Oct 26 '11 at 17:35
    
Great! Thanks! Added the #!/bin/sh and it worked. – John B Oct 26 '11 at 17:35
    
csh is a shell. (It is the program that interprets what you type at the command line.) To use a different shell, just invoke it; type 'bash' for example. Your script is interpreted by a shell, and from the syntax of your script it appears that you expect it to be interpreted by a bourne shell. Make that explicit by adding the shebang line. There are 2 main types of shell: bourne shells and c-shells. The syntaxes are not compatible. – William Pursell Oct 26 '11 at 17:37
1  
Use whatever you like as your interactive shell. sh or bash is better than cah or tcsh for scripts, but tcsh in particular has some nice interactive features. As long as you have a proper shebang (#!) at the top of your scripts you don't need to use the same shell for scripting and for interactive use. Of course there's something to be said for consistency, but it's up to you. The !# is the solution to your problem; chsh is irrelevant. – Keith Thompson Oct 26 '11 at 17:56

try something like this

#!/bin/sh
#
x=10
echo $x
now=$(date +'%Y-%m-%d')
echo $now

This works on my system (Ubuntu 11.04, 64bit). If that doesn't work then you may have some hidden special character in your file.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't have the #!/bin/sh – John B Oct 26 '11 at 17:42

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