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I have a list that I synchronize on named synchronizedMap in my function doMapOperation. In this function, I need to add/remove items from a map and perform expensive operations on these objects. I know that I don't want to call an expensive operation in a synchronized block, but I don't know how to make sure that the map is in a consistent state while I do these operations. What is the right way to do this?

This is my initial layout which I am sure is wrong because you want to avoid calling an expensive operation in a synchronized block:

public void doMapOperation(Object key1, Object key2) {
    synchronized (synchronizedMap) {

        // Remove key1 if it exists.
        if (synchronizedMap.containsKey(key1)) {
            Object value = synchronizedMap.get(key1);
            value.doExpensiveOperation(); // Shouldn't be in synchronized block.

            synchronizedMap.remove(key1);
        }

        // Add key2 if necessary.
        Object value = synchronizedMap.get(key2);
        if (value == null) {
            Object value = new Object();
            synchronizedMap.put(key2, value);
        }

        value.doOtherExpensiveOperation(); // Shouldn't be in synchronized block.
    } // End of synchronization.
}

I guess as a continuation of this question, how would you do this in a loop?

public void doMapOperation(Object... keys) {
    synchronized (synchronizedMap) {

        // Loop through keys and remove them.
        for (Object key : keys) {
            // Check if map has key, remove if key exists, add if key doesn't.
            if (synchronizedMap.containsKey(key)) {
                Object value = synchronizedMap.get(key);
                value.doExpensiveOperation(); // Shouldn't be here.

                synchronizedMap.remove(key);
            } else {
                Object value = new Object();
                value.doAnotherExpensiveOperation(); // Shouldn't here.

                synchronizedMap.put(key, value);
            }
        }
    } // End of synchronization block.
}

Thanks for the help.

share|improve this question
1  
There isn't enough information here to know whether the lock can be relinquished during the slow operations. The key question is whether all of this work has to appear to happen atomically to other threads? If not, which operations should appear atomic? And do operations have to happen atomically on the whole map? In other words, what if you could ensure that operations on a single key were atomic? –  erickson Oct 26 '11 at 18:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do the expensive operations outside your synchronized block like so:

public void doMapOperation(Object... keys) {
    ArrayList<Object> contained = new ArrayList<Object>();
    ArrayList<Object> missing = new ArrayList<Object>();

    synchronized (synchronizedMap) {
        if (synchronizedMap.containsKey(key)) {
            contained.add(synchronizedMap.get(key));
            synchronizedMap.remove(key);
        } else {
            missing.add(synchronizedMap.get(key));
            synchronizedMap.put(key, value);
        }
    }

    for (Object o : contained)
        o.doExpensiveOperation();
    for (Object o : missing)
        o.doAnotherExpensiveOperation();
}

The only disadvantage is you may be performing operations on values after they are removed from the synchronizedMap.

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You can create a wrapper for your synchronizedMap and make sure the operations like containsKey, remove, and put are synchronized methods. Then only access to the map will be synchronized, while your expensive operations can take place outside the synchronized block.

Another advantage is by keeping your expensive operations outside the synchronized block you avoid a possible deadlock risk if the operations call another synchronized map method.

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I understand that wrappers would help make those methods synchronized when they are called, but I would also like to make sure the map is not being modified somewhere else while I am in the process of modifying sychronizedMap. –  Kevin S Oct 26 '11 at 18:13

In the first snippet: Declare the two values out of the if-clause, and just assign them in the if-clause. Make the if-clause synchronized, and invoke the expensive operations outside.

In the 2nd case do the same, but inside the loop. (synchronized inside the loop). You can, of course, have only one synchronized statement, outside the loop, and simply fill a List of objects on which to invoke the expensive operation. Then, in a 2nd loop, outside the synchronized block, invoke that operations on all values in the list.

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Is there anything against having multiple synchronized blocks in a single method? In the 2nd case, if you loop hundreds of time, you are synchronizing hundreds of times. Is that bad? –  Kevin S Oct 26 '11 at 18:16
    
if you need to synchronize a hundred operations, then you need a hundred synchronizations. Check my update for an alternative though –  Bozho Oct 26 '11 at 18:17

We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%. A good programmer will not be lulled into complacency by such reasoning, he will be wise to look carefully at the critical code; but only after that code has been identified. — Donald Knuth

You have a single method, doMapOperation(). What is your performance if this method continues to be block-synchronized? If you don't know then how will you know when you've got a good performing solution? Are you prepared to handle multiple calls to your expensive operations even after they have been removed from the map?

I'm not trying to be condescending, since maybe you understand the problem at hand better than you've conveyed, but it seems like you're jumping into a level of optimization for which you may not be prepared and may not be necessary.

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You can actually do it all with only one synchronization hit. The first remove is probably the easiest. If you know the object exists, and you know remove is atomic, why not just remove it and if what is returned is not null invoke the expensive operations?

 // Remove key1 if it exists.
        if (synchronizedMap.containsKey(key1)) {
            Object value = synchronizedMap.remove(key1);
            if(value != null){ //thread has exclusive access to value 
              value.doExpensiveOperation();
            }
        }

For the put, since it is expensive and should be atomic you are pretty much out of luck and need to synchronize access. I would recommend using some kind of a computing map. Take a look at google-collections and MapMaker

You can create a ConcurrentMap that will build the expensive object based on your key for example

 ConcurrentMap<Key, ExpensiveObject> expensiveObjects = new MapMaker()
       .concurrencyLevel(32)
       .makeComputingMap(
           new Function<Key, ExpensiveObject>() {
             public ExpensiveObject apply(Key key) {
               return createNewExpensiveObject(key);
             }
           });

This is simlpy a form of memoization

In both of these cases, you don't need to use synchronized at all (at least explicitly)

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If you don't have null values in the Map, you don't need the containsKey() call at all: you can use Map.remove() to both remove the item and tell you whether it was there. So the true content of your synchronized block only needs to be this:

Object value = Map.remove(key);
if (value != null)
  value.doExpensiveOperation();
else
{
  value = new Value();
  value.doExpensiveOperation();
  map.put(key,value);
}

If the expensive operation itself doesn't need to be synchronized, i.e. if you don't mind other clients of the Map seeing the value while it is being operated on, you can further simplify to this:

Object value = Map.remove(key);
if (value == null)
{
  value = new Value();
  map.put(key,value);
}
value.doExpensiveOperation();

and the synchronized block can terminate before the expensive operation.

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