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Let's say you have students

and you have teachers

Students log in to the site using a different interface than teachers

Students can do the following on the site - Look up grades - Email teachers

Teachers can do the following on the site - Lookup up students - Input grades

How would you design the database table to allow teachers and students to log in? This question confuses me because I was thinking of doing the following

  • of having a teacher table
  • of having a student table

two separate tables

so

create table teacher ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100) )

create table student ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100) )

Is that how it is usually done? When you have two different entities logging in to two different login interfaces?

--- EDIT ---

also what if the two entities have different fields? Would you still create one Users table with a "Role" in that case.

For example, what if you have the following:

(notice how teacher and student have a few fields different. Would you still create one table to put them both??)

create table teacher ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100) num_of_students int,

)

create table student ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100), gpa decimal(10,2) )

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Picking up on @Fatal's answer: create table user ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100), role varchar(45)) –  Jorge Oct 26 '11 at 17:33
1  
@Jorge I would not save the role by its name inside the User table. I would have a User, Role and User_Role table. There is a N:M relationship between User and Role entity. This is what you basically have in every app with role-based security. –  Fabian Barney Nov 8 '11 at 16:09
    
@Fatal Good to know. I have to study database schemas more in depth. –  Jorge Nov 8 '11 at 18:09
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would consider just making it one table and add a TypeID, where TypeID would classify the type of person be it a student or a teacher.

Take a look at the design of both of those tables, they are exactly the same, this should be a signal to you that you may be overdoing things.

By keeping it in 2 separate tables, it is more UI work for you and more administrative work for the person entering the data.

By combining it into one table and introducing a classification or type field you eliminate all that extra work.

CREATE TABLE Users ( ID int, Type int, name varchar(255), email varchar(100))

I also would not store the password as plain text, as it appears you may be hinting at with password varchar(100). Type in this case could be an int or even a bit datatype if the only two types of personnel will be Students and Teachers. The field could be IsTeacher with 1 being a teacher and 0 being a student. But in most cases, you end up realizing you needed a different type of User, hence the int datatype.

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"Take a look at the design of both of those tables, they are exactly the same, this should be a signal to you that you may be overdoing things." <- This is what the OP should take away from this exercise. –  jmlane Oct 26 '11 at 17:34
    
also what if the two entities have different fields? Would you still create one Users table with a "Role" in that case. For example, what if you have the following: ---- create table teacher ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100) num_of_students int, ) create table student ( name varchar(255), email varchar(100), password varchar(100), gpa decimal(10,2) ) –  Prince Gato Oct 26 '11 at 21:07
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I would have a single login table of an ID, email, password as you have, but tack on a flag for TYPE of login... Admin (Site wide), Teacher, Student, whatever.

Then, from the login, you'll have that "type" as a flag to show/hide elments within the site or offer other redirection as needed.

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I would make one table - person and add field type to it. Type can be STUDENT or TEACHER for example.

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What I would do is have a single table called lets say 'users', then a column called 'role' for example, I would then create a script in each interface that will only allow students to login the student interface and teachers in the teachers interface.

To be honest I would actually only have a single permission based user interface, but that is what I would do if I were to use 2 interfaces.

I hope this helps you.

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Designs in most other answers here lack when a user have to be assigned with two "types" or more. In fact, the question is very obviously about users associated with roles which are thenselves associated with rights. And therefore a typical table layout for role-based security is the best in my opinion.

Entities and Relationship

  • User: John Q. Public, ...
  • Role: Teacher, Student, ...
  • Right: Look up grades, Input grades, Look up students, ...

You've N:M relationship between each:

  • User<->Role
  • Role<->Right (optional)
  • User<->Right (optional)

Maybe checking for roles is enough and you can drop anything with Rights here.

Solution

Just have a User table. (Table: User)

Teacher and Student are Roles which Users can be associated with. (Tables: Role and User_Role)

Another Role you typically have in every application is the Role Admin which for instance can delete other users, reset passwords, create new users ...

When you've complex rights then you can add Right, too. Right can be both associated with User as well as with Role.

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+1 for mentioning role-based security. –  Dan J Oct 26 '11 at 17:34
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