Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

template <typename M>
struct Matrix
{
Matrix(int size);//(int x = defaultRows, int y = defaultCols);
~Matrix();

int rowSize;
int colSize;
char alpha[4];

int getSize() const;
void displayAll();
M getElement(int x, int y);

M** aMatrix;
};


template <typename M>
Matrix<M>::Matrix(int size)
{
alpha = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd'};

rowSize = size;
colSize = size + 1;
aMatrix = new M*[rowSize];

srand(time(NULL)); //set the random seed

for(int r = 0; r < size; r++)
{
    aMatrix[r] = new M[colSize];
    for(int c = 0; c < colSize; c++)
    {
        int randomNum = rand() % 19 + (-9);
        aMatrix[r][c] = randomNum;
    }
}
}

I don't know why, but i keep getting errors when I try to complie the program. Its to do with my "alpha" char array (when I comment it out, it works fine).

I don't see whats wrong with it at all...

The errors are: Error 3 error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '}'

Error 2 error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '{'

Error 1 error C2059: syntax error : '{'

Don't think I have missed anything out have I??

share|improve this question
1  
Accepting valid answers by clicking on the green checkmark helps organize this site and is also a small reward for those who help you. –  hugomg Oct 26 '11 at 17:46
    
alpha = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd'}; - you can't initialize an array like this after you have already declared it elsewhere. You have to do it all in one line. –  birryree Oct 26 '11 at 17:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't do this in C++ (well not for some time anyway):

alpha = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd'};

It looks like an initializer but it's not. Try:

alpha[0] = 'a';
alpha[1] = 'b';
alpha[2] = 'c';
alpha[3] = 'd';

EDIT

Not that it will help you much but C99 (along with some C++ compilers, as an extension) supports this:

alpha = (char[]){'a', 'b', 'c', 'd'};
share|improve this answer
    
Damn... that means I will end up having 26 lines just for the alphabets... Anyway, Thanks for the info :D –  Danny Oct 26 '11 at 18:15

You can't set arrays that way. It's an unfortunate problem with C++ that's fixed in C++11, but for now you have to do something like:

alpha[0] = 'a';
alpha[1] = 'b';
...

or you can do

Matrix<M>::Matrix(int size)
{
    char alpha_init[4] = {'a','b','c','d'};
    std::copy(alpha_init,alpha_init+4,alpha);

In C++11 you will be able to do:

Matrix<M>::Matrix(int size)
  : alpha{'a','b','c','d'}
{

or even more simply (as Michael Price suggests):

struct Matrix {
    /* ... */
    char alpha[4] = {'a','b','c','d'};
    /* ... */
};
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing out that this is solved in C++11. You could also use the in-class-declaration initialization instead of the constructor initializer list. –  Michael Price Oct 26 '11 at 18:18
alpha = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd'};

Arrays can only be initialized that way within its definition. When an array is a member of a class, that form of initialization cannot be used. You will have to do it the regular way, one element at a time:

alpha[0] =  'a';
alpha[1] =  'b';
alpha[2] =  'c';
alpha[3] =  'd';
share|improve this answer

As other's have pointed out, this syntax would only work to initialize an array, and by the time you get into the constructor body, the array is already initialized. C++11 has a nice syntax for letting you initialize arrays in the initializer list, but that may or may not yet be available for your C++ compiler.

The other's recommendations work, but I would not suggest them. They're verbose and look a bit ugly mostly, and they will not work with arbitrarily large arrays because at some point the whole thing just becomes unwieldy. So here's what I would do...

   static const char alpha_init[] = "abcd";
   ::std::copy(alpha_init, alpha_init+4, alpha);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.