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I'm struggling hard to find a proper design to avoid referencing a Repository from an Entity... Let's say I've got the classic Customer and Order classes like so:

public class Customer {
    ...
    public IEnumerable<Order> Orders { get; set; }
}

public class Order {
    ...
    public Customer Customer { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<OrderItem> OrderItems { get; set; }

    public void Submit() {
       ...
    }
}

public class OrderItem {
    public Product Product { get; set; }
    public decimal SellingPrice { get; set; }
}

Now, let's say that the Product's selling price depends for some reason on the fact that the Product was also purchased (or not) on the previous Order, the number of items on the current order and previous order, etc. I could do this:

public void Submit() {
    Order lastOrder = this.Customer.Orders.LastOrDefault();
    CalculatePrice(lastOrder);

but that would load the whole order list of Orders when I only really need the last one!

What I'd like to do is something more like this:

public void Submit() {
    Order lastOrder = _orderRepository.GetLastOrderFor(Customer);
    CalculatePrice(lastOrder);

But I understand referencing the OrderRepository in the Domain is bad DDD. So, what do I do? Do I have to put the Submit() elsewhere than in the Domain? If so, where do you suggest?

share|improve this question
    
if that is a stable business rule that happens for all purchases, you could change your command as such to Submit(Order mostRecent). Or you could also externalize the pricing algorithm to another class and pass that into the command Submit(IPriceCalculator calc) –  Marco Oct 26 '11 at 18:26
    
If I externalize the pricing algorithm, where the IPriceCalculator implementation be? That really seems like to Domain Logic to me, no? –  dstj Oct 26 '11 at 18:37
    
It is simply a domain service, so it belongs in your domain package. –  Marco Oct 26 '11 at 18:43
1  
Ok, thanks for your explanation. So I think it's right to say the referencing an Repository in a domain Entity is bad design, but it's OK to reference it in a Domain Service .. –  dstj Oct 26 '11 at 19:37
1  
correct. domain services are needed when a particular behavior/process does not "fit" within an existing class. you could shoe horn it in, but you'll also notice the increase/decrease in cohesion and coupling. –  Marco Oct 26 '11 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have two varieties:

Create a domain service and add a dependency to the repository from it:

public class MyPricingStrategy : IPricingStrategy
{
  public MyPricingStrategy(IOrderRepository repository)
  { ... }
}

this way you will make domain service reference repository which is not very bad idea.

Another option is to make the pricing strategy a domain object with application layer passing it required data from repository:

public class LastOrderPricingStrategy
{
  public LastOrderPricingStrategy(Order lastOrder)
  { ... }
}

in application layer

var lastOrder = orderRepository.GetLastOrder(currentCustomer);
var pricingStrategy = new LastOrderPricingStrategy(lastOrder);
share|improve this answer

The Customer object could have a LastOrder property:

public class Customer {
    ...
    public IEnumerable<Order> Orders { get; set; }
    public Order LastOrder { get; set; }
}

So part of the logic of making an order sets this field, and this will be saved with the Customer. Then when you load the customer, you will quickly know what the last order way, and make your decisions based on that accordingly.

Another way, if you are using an ORM like NHibernate, you could create a multi query to eagerly load the Orders collection with only the last order. then you could go back to using this:

public void Submit() {
    Order lastOrder = this.Customer.Orders.LastOrDefault();
    CalculatePrice(lastOrder);

and it would not need to load anything because the order you need will be in there. Eagerly loading only the objects I'm going to need in a collection is a pattern I use quite a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am using NHibernate. Are you saying that I get Eager load only the last order and then Lazy load all orders if I access anything but the last order? How would I do that?! I thought eager loading was to load all child objects when loading the parent... –  dstj Oct 31 '11 at 13:01
    
This puzzled me at first because it has never come up, and I was wondering why it never had. I've never eagerly loaded one object, and then needed the rest. But then it was obvious: If ever I've needed all the objects, I've eagerly loaded them all! You wouldn't only load one object if you're going to need them al. –  Paul T Davies Nov 1 '11 at 10:57
    
The problem with your suggested approach is that if the Customer has 5000 orders, we load them all even thought we only actually use the last one (in this price calculation scenario). This is an unnecessary performance hit... –  dstj Nov 1 '11 at 17:33
    
I'm not suggesting that at all. What I'm saying is, if you are only going to use one order, only load that one order. If you are going to use all the orders, load all the orders. –  Paul T Davies Nov 2 '11 at 14:34

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