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I need help with a regex to capture the numbers and hyphen from the following string: "some text and stuff 200-1234EM some other stuff"

It can also appear without the hypenated part: "some text 123EM other text"

I need either "200-1234" or "123" in a named capture group.

I tried this: \b([0-9]{0,3}\-{0,1}[0-9]{3})EM\b

It does match, but it is not a named group.

When I try to name the group like this: \b(?<test>[0-9]{0,3}\-{0,1}[0-9]{3})EM\b I get an error message "Unknown look-behind group near index 34"

I need this to work in the .NET RegEx class

Thanks!

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That works for me. –  SLaks Oct 26 '11 at 18:13
    
Where are you testing this? While the regex is incorrect (see @FailedDev's answer for a correct one), the named-group syntax is correct for .NET. –  Alan Moore Oct 26 '11 at 18:20
    
for me as well, using the silverlight tester at wwww.regexlib.com in the regex-tester –  Ruben Oct 26 '11 at 18:22
    
Are you sure it's the same regex it's failing? You have no lookbehind in your regex. –  FailedDev Oct 26 '11 at 18:25
    
@Alan: I was using some stupid online java based tester, hence the naming issue. Thanks for the regexlib.com tip, their silverlight tester is nice –  Joon Oct 26 '11 at 18:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
resultString = Regex.Match(subjectString, @"\b(?<number>\d+(?:-\d+)?)EM\b").Groups["number"].Value;

This should do the trick. If you provide more input I could make it more robust.

Explanation:

    @"
\b            # Assert position at a word boundary
(?<number>    # Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference with name “number”
   \d            # Match a single digit 0..9
      +             # Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
   (?:           # Match the regular expression below
      -             # Match the character “-” literally
      \d            # Match a single digit 0..9
         +             # Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
   )?            # Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
)
EM            # Match the characters “EM” literally
\b            # Assert position at a word boundary
"
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, that works perfectly. Thanks! –  Joon Oct 26 '11 at 18:32

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