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A lot of my debug code is wrapped in a header/footer. Usually I run a script that just removes all of it from source before I stage and commit the changes. If the debug code needs to persist a commit I'll run git add -p and stage the chunks individually.

My question is if it's possible to stage changes based on a regex? For example, given this snippet of javascript:

function littleNinja( sword ) {
    /* debug:start */
    console.log( sword );
    /* debug:stop */
    // do stuff
}

I don't want git to stage the lines between and including debug:start and debug:stop, and my hope is that this process could be automated.

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That's not possible. Even if it were, sometimes the debug chunk would be inseparable from another chunk which you do want staged. You need a custom script that would handle this situation for you, or delegate the choice to you interactively. Then maybe alias the script as a git command. –  wilhelmtell Oct 26 '11 at 18:27
    
Figured that was the case, but wanted to double check. Thanks. –  Trev Norris Oct 26 '11 at 18:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A good way of doing this is to use clean and smudge filters to filter out the marked lines as they are staged. (The description below is essentially the same as the procedure described in that section of "Pro Git", and which is very similar to that in the git attributes documentation.) First of all, we need a command that removes the lines between (and including) each debug:start and debug:end — fortunately, this is a simple job with sed:

sed '/debug:start/,/debug:stop/d' < foo.js

Now create a .gitattributes file in the top level of your git repository which contains the following line:

*.js filter=strip-debug

And now define what the strip-debug filter does both when 'cleaning' (on staging) or 'smudging' (on checkout):

git config filter.strip-debug.clean "sed '/debug:start/,/debug:stop/d'"
git config filter.strip-debug.smudge cat

I've (very briefly) tested this and it seems to do what you want.

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Awesome! +1 Trev: You should accept Mark's answer, it is far better than mine (and also, I can't delete it because it is accepted). –  greg0ire Oct 27 '11 at 13:40
    
Awesome. Thank you very much for explaining how to do this in detail. –  Trev Norris Oct 31 '11 at 18:08

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