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I don't want to loop through the list comparing each property. Something with this functionality:

class myClass
{
    public int I { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<myClass> l = new List<myClass>();

        myClass x = new myClass();
        x.I = 1;
        l.Add(x);

        myClass y = new myClass();
        y.I = 2;
        l.Add(y);

        myClass z = new myClass();
        z.I = 2;

        if (l.ContainsAnInstanceEqualTo(z))
            Console.WriteLine("Contains");

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

IMPORTANT: I have no control over the class and there are a few properties which should have the same value.

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1  
Override Equals and GetHashCode. List.Contains will use your overriden implementation then. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 26 '11 at 18:43

4 Answers 4

You should make myClass implement IEquatable<myClass> (or at least override Equals(object)) and then just use:

if (l.Contains(z))

(You should also rename the class to follow .NET naming conventions...)

If you don't provide an Equals method, you've got to specify what sort of equality you're interested in somehow. You can do this via something like Find with a predicate:

var found = l.Find(c => c.I == z.I);
if (found != null)
{
    ...
}

Or using LINQ:

var any = l.Any(c => c.I == z.I);

but it would be better to override Equals if there is a natural sense of equality.

(List<T>.Contains won't use your implementation of GetHashCode, but you should implement it in line with your Equals method anyway...)

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Forgot to say I have no control over the class –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 26 '11 at 18:46
    
Then use the LINQ-approach mentioned by Jon. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 26 '11 at 18:50
    
There are a few properties. How to compare then all? –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 26 '11 at 18:56
2  
@Clodoaldo: Are you searching for something like that? var any = l.Any(c => c.I == z.I && c.II = z.II && c.III = z.III); –  Otiel Oct 26 '11 at 19:07
1  
@Otiel That works but I was searching for something less verbose as there are quite a few properties. –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 26 '11 at 19:24

Use the Contains method with a Predicate<myClass>:

if (l.Contains(item => item.I == z.I))
    Console.WriteLine("Contains");
share|improve this answer
    
How to compare more than one property? –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 26 '11 at 18:50
    
You could write a more complicated lambda expression such as item => item.I == z.I && item.J == z.J, but much more than that I would write a method that receives two instances of the class and compares them, returning a bool: l.Contains(item => IsTheSame(item, z)) –  FishBasketGordo Oct 27 '11 at 0:54

You may be confusing some of the terminology here... In your example, even if Y and Z have the same values for I, they're not the same instance. If you are hoping to figure out whether or not their values are the same, you could either override the Object.Equals() method, or you could use Object.GetHashCode() method. You could even consider possibly using a Dictionary in some fashion.

If you are trying to determine whether or not the exact instance of the element that you're trying to add already exists in the list, you may want to consider looking at a HashSet.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is my try at creating an EqualityComparer that should compare public instance properties of any class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class MyClass
    {
        public int I { get; set; }
        public string S { get; set; }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            HashSet<MyClass> hs = new HashSet<MyClass>(new SamePublicPropertiesInstance());

            MyClass x = new MyClass();
            x.I = 1;
            x.S = "1";
            hs.Add(x);
            MyClass y = new MyClass();
            y.I = 2;
            y.S = "1";
            hs.Add(y);
            MyClass z = new MyClass();
            z.I = 2;
            z.S = "1";
            hs.Add(z);

            foreach (MyClass m in hs)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("I: {0} S: {1}", m.I, m.S);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

class SamePublicPropertiesInstance : EqualityComparer<object>
{
    public override bool Equals(object o1, object o2)
    {
        PropertyInfo[] pInfos = o1.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
        string pName;
        bool equal;
        MethodInfo methodInfo;

        foreach (PropertyInfo pInfo in pInfos)
        {
            pName = pInfo.Name.ToString();
            methodInfo = o1.GetType().GetProperty(pName).GetGetMethod();
            equal = methodInfo.Invoke(o1, null).ToString() 
                    == 
                    methodInfo.Invoke(o2, null).ToString();
            if (!equal) return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode(object o)
    {
        return 1.GetHashCode();
    }
}
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