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I have a shell script that contains the following loop.

i=0  
upperlimit=$verylargevariable  
do  
   complexstuff RunManager file $i  
   i= 'expr $i +1'  
done

This script runs on a quad core machine, and according to top, uses about 15% of each core while executing one iteration of the loop. I'd like to distribute it across the four cores so that each iteration of the loop does complexstuff four times, one on each core, so the resources will be used more efficiently. We're talking about computation that currently takes several hours so efficiency is more than just good practice here. (The output of each iteration is obviously independent of the previous one.)

PS: Host is a server running Cent-OS, if that helps.

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you're going to have to look at something like Hadoop to distribute processing, you'll also have to restructure your processing so each step can be broken up across cores. Unless I'm missing something, not a trivial problem. Good luck! –  shellter Oct 26 '11 at 18:51
    
Is complexstuff an executable or another shell script? –  bos Oct 26 '11 at 18:52
1  
@boscomplexstuff is an executable. @shellter Thanks for the good luck, I'm gonna need it! Though I don't see why I have to restructure my processing beyond that one loop. –  Yitzchak Oct 26 '11 at 19:02
    
Have a look att xargs(1), in particular the -P option. –  bos Oct 26 '11 at 19:04
    
(Slight edit for clarity after 5 min mark ;-( ) Good show @OleTange ! That does look promising. I'm still skeptical that Yitzchak will get 4x increase in speed unless his exe is designed as multi-threaded process. If it was, he'd see higher utiliziation than 15% on the process. But I'll be glad to be wrong ;-), so please, please, please Yitzchak, if you get to test this, post your before and after results! Good luck –  shellter Oct 27 '11 at 3:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Apart the Ole Tange solution (that looks great), if your computations have pretty similar durations, you can try something like this :

i=0  
upperlimit=$verylargevariable  
do  
   complexstuff RunManager file $i &
   i= 'expr $i + 1'
   complexstuff RunManager file $i &
   i= 'expr $i + 1'
   complexstuff RunManager file $i &
   i= 'expr $i + 1'
   complexstuff RunManager file $i &
   i= 'expr $i + 1'
   wait
done

This way, on each run of the loop, you will create 4 bash subprocesses that will launch your computations (and as system is great, it will dispatch them on the different cores). If with 4 processes it is not enough to burn all your cpus, raise the number of processes created on each loop.

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I ended up using this solution. Simple, and effective. Thanks! –  Yitzchak Nov 2 '11 at 20:41

With GNU Parallel you can do:

seq $verylargevariable | parallel -j150% complexstuff RunManager file

The 150% will run 1.5 process per core so if it currently uses 15% this should give you around 100% on all 4 cores.

To learn more watch the intro videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpaiGYxkSuQ

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Looks great, thanks! I have to wait for the sysadmins to install it, so I'll accept the answer when I get it to work. :) –  Yitzchak Oct 26 '11 at 20:20
1  
To install the program (without docs and stuff) copy git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/parallel.git/plain/src/parallel to your homedir and run it from there. It should work for all platforms. –  Ole Tange Oct 27 '11 at 14:12
1  
Note that on recent versions of Ubuntu you need to run "parallel --gnu ..." in order to use GNU parallel. –  Gerald Senarclens de Grancy Jan 24 '13 at 13:08

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