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I wonder if it's always possible to rewrite LEFT JOIN using old Oracle syntax(+). In particular, I tried to express the following query using (+)

SELECT *
FROM table_1 a
LEFT JOIN table_2 b ON (b.table1_id = a.id AND b.other_field = 'value1')

without success. Is it possible at all?
Thank you.

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On our Oracle instance, we found that using the oracle (+) syntax ran the same query much much slower e.g. hours instead of minutes. Using standard join syntax performed best. –  David d C e Freitas Sep 22 '13 at 23:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm guessing you're not using the (+) operator in the test of b.other_field.. This should work:

SELECT *
FROM table_1 a, table_2 b 
WHERE b.table1_id(+) = a.id 
AND b.other_field(+) = 'value1'
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Thanks, you are right. I didn't use it properly (actually, I had never used the old syntax before I had to deal with legacy code). Thanks for your answer –  a1ex07 Oct 26 '11 at 20:29
2  
No problem. You might find this interesting if you've not used the old style before... –  StevieG Oct 26 '11 at 20:34

If I recall correctly, it's not always possible to rewrite an ANSI join in Oracle's old outer join syntax, because the order of execution can change the rows returned.

What does "without success" mean? Did you get an error? Did you get the wrong rows? Did you get the wrong columns?

A left join will preserve all the rows in table_1. The basic form of old-style Oracle syntax is a Cartesian product with a WHERE clause, and a "+" token on the other table. (This doesn't include your entire WHERE clause. That's deliberate.)

SELECT *
FROM table_1 a, table_2 b
WHERE a.id = b.table1_id(+)

See, for example, AskTom.

For troubleshooting . . .

If you start with your query

SELECT *
FROM table_1 a
LEFT JOIN table_2 b ON (b.table1_id = a.id AND b.other_field = 'value1')

and eliminated the aliases, you'd have

SELECT *
FROM table_1
LEFT JOIN table_2 ON (table_2.table1_id = table_1.id AND 
                      table_2.other_field = 'value1')

Are there actually columns named table_2.table1_id and table_1.id? Does that work?

If that's not the problem start simpler. Try this.

SELECT table_1.id, table_2.table1_id
FROM table_1
INNER JOIN table_2 ON (table_2.table1_id = table_1.id);

Does that work? Next try this.

SELECT table_1.id, table_2.table1_id
FROM table_1
LEFT JOIN table_2 ON (table_2.table1_id = table_1.id);

If that works, try adding the rest of your JOIN clause.

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2  
I think you've missed the question entirely.. There is nothing wrong with the provided SQL - the OP wants to rewrite it using the Oracle (+) syntax instead.. –  StevieG Oct 26 '11 at 20:15
    
I included the Oracle syntax. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Oct 26 '11 at 20:33

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