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The compiler is telling me that these signatures are incompatiable, but they seem fine to me. Am I missing something? [VS 2008]

Public MustOverride Function OverridePickUpLocationFromDeliveryAddress(ByVal objDeliveryAddress As DeliveryLocationWS.DeliveryAddress, _
                                                                       ByRef lstProcessingMessages As List(Of String), _
                                                                       ByVal objProcessorHelperLists As ProcessorHelperLists) As Integer

Public Sub New()    
    Dim fncTest As Func(Of DeliveryLocationWS.DeliveryAddress, List(Of String), ProcessorHelperLists, Integer) = AddressOf OverridePickUpLocationFromDeliveryAddress
End Sub
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Note that even turning those custom Types into the generic Object Type results in the same error. Function Foo(byval objX As Object, ByRef lstX As List(of String), Byval objY As Object) As Integer / Dim fncFoo As Func(of Object, List(of String), Object, Integer) = addressOf Foo –  NoAlias Oct 26 '11 at 20:25
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your function takes a paramater by reference (lstProcessingMessages), which is unacceptable to the Func(Of T1, T2, T3, T4) you're trying to assign it to.

The Func delegate doesn't support "by ref" as a type argument, as far as I know.

static void Main()
{
    Func<int, int> myDoItFunc1 = DoIt; // Doesn't work because of ref param
    Func<int, int> myDoItFunc2 = DoItFunc; // Does work
}

public static int DoItFunc(int i)
{
    return DoIt(ref i);
}

public static int DoIt(ref int i)
{
    return 0;
}

But why are you passing lstProcessingMessages by ref anyways? It's a reference type. Are you expecting to entirely replace the list's reference, or could you just Clear and populate instead?

static void Main()
{
    var myList = new List<int>();

    AddToMyList(myList);

    // myList now contains 3 integers.

    ReplaceList(myList);

    // myList STILL contains 3 integers.

    ReplaceList(ref myList);

    // myList is now an entirely new list.
}

public static void AddToMyList(List<int> myList)
{
    myList.Add(1); // Works because you're calling "add"
    myList.Add(2); // on the *same instance* of my list
    myList.Add(3); // (object is a reference type, and List extends object)
}

public static void ReplaceList(List<int> myList)
{
    myList = new List<int>();
}

public static void ReplaceList(ref List<int> myList)
{
    myList = new List<int>();
}
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The List of Strings was a list I planned on adding to, but I'll have to make it return a custom object that has both the integer and a list(of String). –  NoAlias Oct 26 '11 at 20:50
2  
No, you won't. Just pass the list in ByVal, and add items to it. –  Christopher Harris Oct 26 '11 at 20:58
1  
If your OverridePickUpLocationFromDeliveryAddress method must create a new list, then yes, you do need to declare the parameter ByRef. But it might be easier to create a new list, pass it in ByVal, and just populate it in the method. –  Scott Rippey Oct 26 '11 at 21:05
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Func does not work, as the parameters are declared as ByVal. However, you can declare your own delegate type:

Delegate Function PickUpLocationDelegate(ByVal objDeliveryAddress As DeliveryLocationWS.DeliveryAddress, _
  ByRef lstProcessingMessages As List(Of String), _
  ByVal objProcessorHelperLists As ProcessorHelperLists) As Integer

Public Sub New()
    Dim fncTest As PickUpLocationDelegate = AddressOf OverridePickUpLocationFromDeliveryAddress
End Sub
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