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... is what I want to do. I have the following code:

... 
    int len = 0; 
    char c; 
    bool fp = false;

    while (infile.good()) {
            c = infile.get();
            if (c == '\n') ++len;
            else if (c == '.') fp = true;
    }  

    if (fp == true){
            float Ai[N];
            float *Ao = new float [len];
    } else {
            int Ai[N];
            int *Ao = new int [len];
    }  

    for (int i=0; i<L; ++i){
            for (int j=0; j<N; ++j) infile >> Ai[j];
            Ao[i] = findmax(Ai);
    }
...

It is supposed to make the array out of doubles if a decimal point is detected in the file or, if not, out of integers.

I didn't check the first loop yet because I didn't get it to compile:

warning: unused variable ‘Ai’                                                         
warning: unused variable ‘Ao’
warning: unused variable ‘Ai’
warning: unused variable ‘Ao’
error: ‘Ai’ was not declared in this scope
error: ‘Ao’ was not declared in this scope

I suppose I have a fundamental problem with how to deal with this task and not just a simple error.

So, what is wrong and how to fix/make it right from the beginning?

share|improve this question
    
Ai and Ao go out of scope once the if block finishes –  slartibartfast Oct 26 '11 at 20:18
    
Only slightly related to your question: Input loops like yours often have bugs. Try while(infile.get(c)) { ... } to read input one char at a time. –  Robᵩ Oct 26 '11 at 20:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Edit: As commented above, your compiler error comes from Ao and Ai being declared in a different scope than where you are trying to use it.


This is where templates come in real handy.

template<typename T>
T *findMaxes(inFile)
{
    T Ai[N];
    T *Ao = new T[len];

    for (int i = 0; i < L; ++i)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < N; ++j)
            infile >> Ai[j];
        Ao[i] = findmax(Ai);
    }

    return Ao;
}




int len = 0; 
char c; 
bool fp = false;

while (infile.good()) {
        c = infile.get();
        if (c == '\n') ++len;
        else if (c == '.') fp = true;
}  

if (fp)
{
    float *Ao = findMaxes<float>(inFile);

    // Do stuff with the floating point array
}
else
{
    int *Ao = findMaxes<int>(inFile);

    // Do stuff with the int array
}
share|improve this answer

The short answer: You cannot do this.

C++ is a statically typed language, which means that you have to decide the type of a variable at compile-time (i.e. when writing the code). You cannot say something like "declare x to be of type get_type_from_user().

With inheritance-based polymorphism you could rig up some setup where you handle everything via a base-class reference, but the actual instantiation type is determined at runtime. This is almost definitely overkill for your setup, I imagine, but that's the standard way one handles runtime dependences on details in C++. However, this doesn't work for primitive types, which are not of class type.

Here's a naive, type-erasing overkill example:

class NumberImpl;

class Number
{
  NumberImpl * pNum;
public:
  explicit Number(int n) : pNum(new NumberInteger(n)) { }
  explicit Number(double d) : pNum(new NumberDouble(d)) { }
  // ..
};

class NumberImpl { /* ... common implementation interface here ... */ }

class NumberInteger : public NumberImpl
{
  int n;
public:
  NumberInteger(int m) : n(m) { }
  // ...
};

// and so forth

This sort of type erasure is used by boost.any and by shared_ptr, and it has some merits. Whether you need it is up to you (but the answer is "no"), and you can probably go happily with just one common numeric type. If you make it long double, you typically get 64 bits of integral precision, plus tons of scale range.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like how you got it to be in-depth but short –  sehe Oct 26 '11 at 20:34

your problem is with scope.. if you declare a variable within an if block, it will only exist within that block. By the time you get to your final for loop, Ao doesn't exist any more. You could try this:

if (fp == true)
{
    float Ai[N];
    float *Ao = new float [len];
    for (int i=0; i<L; ++i)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<N; ++j) infile >> Ai[j];
        Ao[i] = findmax(Ai);
    }
}
else 
{
    int Ai[N];
    int *Ao = new int [len];
    for (int i=0; i<L; ++i)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<N; ++j) infile >> Ai[j];
        Ao[i] = findmax(Ai);
    }
}  
share|improve this answer

You're right about the fundamental problem here. You Ai variables go out of scope at the closing "}"s. So you are not allowed to use them anymore afterwards. That also explain the warnings, because you never use those variables before they vanish.

C++ is statically typed, so you can't just change the type of variables at runtime.

You could look into unions to place either floats or int into a variable. An approach closer to C++ could involve inheritance. But you could just as well duplicate the code (duck) if you only have those two cases.

share|improve this answer
    
arg... at least propose to use typesafe, strong-exception-guarantee boost::variant<...> instead of plain unions (here) –  sehe Oct 26 '11 at 20:33
    
Agreed. Those are much nicer solution to the problem. –  dantje Oct 26 '11 at 20:38

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